Greenhouse in the Spring

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Leading up to Memorial Day weekend is our busiest planting week across all clients and projects.  The weekend follows shortly after our frost-free date, which results in a buildup in the greenhouse followed by a mass clearing out by early June. The following photos show the progression of our greenhouse over the past few weeks leading up to this week and how quickly things change. I will follow up this post in early June to show the much altered state.

 

GREENHOUSE SPACE:

We order in about 5,000 perennials and 15,000 – 20,000 annuals plants for the start of the session for our own use, we are not a nursery that is open to the public. We start in February potting and organizing the greenhouse and continue for the remainder of the spring monitoring until the plants are loaded for client projects. We store these items between two greenhouses and one perennial pad. We also have dedicated space for larger shrubs and trees which is more real-time inventory system.  The photos below show our greenhouse spaces between April 20 – May 18.

 

IN THE GREENHOUSE, APRIL 20. 

This is the interior of our main greenhouse which houses are delicate perennials/succulent collection over the winter and our collection of annuals for the season. We use as much space as we can with overhead drip lines watering hanging annuals. It should be noted that we don’t use the hanging baskets as hanging baskets, rather we will take the entire 10″ basket and plant it in the ground for maximum impact.  By this date, we have been growing the annuals for 1.5 months. We plan that we will house the plants for 8-10 weeks from plug to install. Greenhouse in the Spring, Thinking Outside the Boxwood Greenhouse in the Spring, Thinking Outside the BoxwoodGreenhouse in the Spring, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

 

 

 

By this point we have moved our perennials out to the pad area.  This compact location gives us easy watering, access and ability to cover should we need during frost etc while freeing up greenhouse space for the more delicate plants.

Greenhouse in the Spring, Thinking Outside the Boxwood Greenhouse in the Spring, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

 

We have a second greenhouse that we use primarily to house more delicate perennials.

Greenhouse in the Spring, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

 

IN THE GREENHOUSE APRIL 27. 

We have reached our 2 month mark for annuals and we had a fairly mild spring with warm days and a few cold snaps. You can tell the

 

Greenhouse in the Spring, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

 

 

I love the graphic patterns in the placement of the plants on the tables. Greenhouse in the Spring, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

Below you can see how the drip lines are feeding our hanging annuals. These plants will be going into the ground, not continue as hanging baskets. This method provides us with larger plants at installation compared to a traditional flat size.

Greenhouse in the Spring, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

 

You can see the growth on the perennial pads and the additional of a few more plants from the perennial greenhouse.

 

Greenhouse in the Spring, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

Greenhouse in the Spring, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

 

 

This is a look at the perennial greenhouse looking from the other direction. We use use rice haul (the light brown surrounding a few of the plants) on a few of the perennials to keep the weeds down to a minimum.

Greenhouse in the Spring, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

 

 

IN THE GREENHOUSE MAY 18. 

By this point we had just started planting our annuals in the ground and the organization of the greenhouse gets distributed by the constant pulling for projects. The annuals in the hanging baskets are much bigger than back on April 27 and will make instant impact when planted in ground compared to traditional flats.  I took fewer photos this week, mainly because it started getting chaotic.

Greenhouse in the Spring, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

 

Here are a client’s window baskets planted and ready to load for install. We use the end of the greenhouse for easy staging, potting and loading.

Greenhouse in the Spring, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

 

By this point the center isle of the perennial greenhouse is getting tighter and tighter.

Greenhouse in the Spring, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

Yew Dell Botanical Garden Visit

Family Gardening, G A R D E N S, Garden Tours, gardening, Gardens, Hedge, Inspiration, Landscape, Landscape Design | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

A few weeks back, the family and I had a long weekend trip to Nashville, TN. Along our drive, a much needed pit stop was timed with a visit to Yew Dell Botanical garden, just outside Louisville, KY. It was during a grey and chilly, fall day, so we had the gardens to ourselves other than the few vendors setting up for a wedding later that day.

Yew Dell Botanical Garden Visit, Thinking Outside the Boxwood, Corten Gate

About Yew Dell (excerpt from Yew Dell’s website):

Beginning with 33-acres of Oldham County farmland in 1941, Theodore and Martha Lee Klein spent the next 60-plus years developing an exquisite private estate, a successful commercial nursery and an extensive collection of unusual plants and outstanding gardens. Known locally, nationally and internationally as a first-rate plantsman, Theodore Klein was also a self-taught artisan who personally crafted the buildings and gardens that became known as Yew Dell.

Through the years, Klein collected over one thousand unusual specimen trees and shrubs which were displayed and evaluated in his arboretum. He also worked to develop new plant varieties for the regional landscape, amassing an impressive list of more than 60 unique introductions over his professional career.

Yew Dell Botanical Garden Visit, Thinking Outside the Boxwood, Gourd Hut

Today Yew Dell features Klein’s original designs spaces along with some new additions keeping inline with his philosophy of looking for plants that naturally thrive the region of Kentucky. Touring the gardens you not only see mature varieties of trees and plants, but also new varieties in trial before being available to the market, carrying on Yew Dell’s history of innovation. You can read much more on the Yew Dell website on the history and specific gardens (here).

Yew Dell Botanical Garden Visit, Thinking Outside the Boxwood, Holly Allée Yew Dell Botanical Garden Visit, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

 

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