Seasonal Color for Your Mood

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I am an advocate container and seasonal color for the ability to change your homes’ mood from season to season and introduce elements that provide a twist to the story of your landscape. This home in historical German Village is a great showcase how seasonal color can provide serious (and noncommittal) impact. The front yard space is about 7 feet deep and is planted with low, monochromatic and textural plantings. This was done intentionally to place the focus the window boxes and containers which are replanted four times a year with annuals and perennials. This frequent change allows us to change the mood and tones of the garden with the seasons and homeowners’ humor.

Summer 2014 – Color Explosion 

Seasonal Color for Your Mood, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

Our color expert, Steve, and I created the combo for the windows to showcase an explosion of color. As you look at the house the two window boxes flank a central planter that is plant with Sterlitzia nicolai and Ipomea ‘Illusion Emerald Lace’.  The containers were kept simple with just two species because the window boxes behind were the real show in this case.

Seasonal Color for Your Mood, Thinking Outside the Boxwood Coleus ‘Dark Chocolate’, Lantana ‘Luscious Lemonade’, Begonia bolivensis ‘Waterfall Encanto Orange’,  Setcreasea pallida ‘Purple Heart’, and Dichondra argentea ‘Emerald Falls’, Seasonal Color for Your Mood, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

In this pair of window boxes you can see the amount of color and texture that is billowing over the edges.  Plant Identification (Starting from the top down) Coleus ‘Dark Chocolate’, Lantana ‘Luscious Lemonade’, Begonia bolivensis ‘Waterfall Encanto Orange’,  Setcreasea pallida ‘Purple Heart’, and Dichondra argentea ‘Emerald Falls’

 

Fall 2013 – Dark & Moody 

As we moved into fall the planters were planted in a monochromatic scheme of blue and purples.  Redbor Kale (Brassica oleracea ‘Redbor’ and Medusa Ornamental Pepper (Capsicum annuum) were used alongside pansies to add some fall flair.

 

Seasonal Color for Your Mood, Thinking Outside the BoxwoodSeasonal Color for Your Mood, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

Looking at the planter with Redbor Kale, Medusa Peppers and Silver Scroll Heuchera and Setcreasea pallida ‘Purple Heart’

 

Winter 2013: Extened greens

Adding Winter containers are normally the most appreciated in Ohio when most landscapes are brown, grey and dull green.  Adding lights and hits of color always brings a welcomig impact that can stay long past the traditional Christmas decorations. The planters are filled with a Fraser Fir greenery, Southern Magnolia, Leyland cypress and scarlet curly willow.

 Fraser Fir greenery, Southern Magnolia, Leyland cypress and scarlet curly willow, Seasonal Color for Your Mood, Thinking Outside the Boxwood  Fraser Fir greenery, Southern Magnolia, Leyland cypress and eucalyptus:  Seasonal Color for Your Mood, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

Looking at the front door we also draped the entry with a lush garland to welcome holiday guests and passersby. The garland and wreath at the front and embellished with eucalyptus, magnolia and Leyland  cypress  to tie in with the window boxes and planters.

Kenneth Lynch & Sons, Inc.

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The other weekend my father-in-law gifted me with a copy of Kenneth Lynch & Son’s Garden Ornaments catalog from the 1970s. It is 176 pages of garden furniture, ornaments, containers, fountains, and statues made in cast stone, iron and lead. Tucked inside was a reprinted article from the September, 1951 issue of The Saturday Evening Post about the company founder, Kenneth Lynch. Trained as a blacksmith, Lynch was known for his work in restoring and recreating metal armor and motto “if its made of metal, Kenneth Lynch can make it.” He expanded his design offering from purchasing the cast off molds, dies and patterns from other metal smiths marginal lines.

Kenneth Lynch & Sons, Inc., Thinking Outside the Boxwood

On the left is my 1970s catalog. On the right is the catalog/book I received when I contacted Kenneth Lynch & Sons for a copy of their current catalog. There are some products that are listed in both, but both feature items not included in the other.  If you are interested in their products you really need to request a catalog or download the PDF version. The website does not provide great photo examples of their work outside the catalog. 

 

The Saturday Evening Post article gave a great framework on the company’s history and transformation. It includes the great lesson to always say yes and have a “can do attitude,” you never know where that will take you. My favorite anadote is how he had a police officer help him steal a one of a kind sample bench for the 1939-40 World’s Fair so he could copy measurements and make molds to help win the work fabricating the 800 benches needed for the fair. Also, he did the work within the two week deadline.

Kenneth Lynch & Sons, Inc., Thinking Outside the Boxwood

Here is the drawings for the Worlds Fair Bench, which is also used in New York City Parks. If interested you can still order this bench design. 

 

Even if you are not thinking of purchasing from the company, the catalogs give you great inspiration for design work and containers. Here are some detailed shots from inside the catalog of favorite pages.

Kenneth Lynch & Sons, Inc., Thinking Outside the Boxwood

A lot of these tables do not appear in the current catalog, but I like the legs on the wrought iron legs. Simple design without a lot of extra flourish. 

 

Kenneth Lynch & Sons, Inc., Thinking Outside the Boxwood

I gather planters were not a favorite product since there were just a few pages of containers. What they do offer are a lot of different shapes and scale. 

 

Kenneth Lynch & Sons, Inc., Thinking Outside the Boxwood

Showcase of the detailed banning options for lead containers. 

 

Kenneth Lynch & Sons, Inc., Thinking Outside the Boxwood

The animal shapes of the kids playground equipment are amazing and great reference for making some almost mid century topiary shapes. 

 

Kenneth Lynch & Sons, Inc., Thinking Outside the Boxwood Kenneth Lynch & Sons, Inc., Thinking Outside the Boxwood

The straight lines of the chairs on the bottom left feel modern and contemporary. Even the scroll own on the loungers are unique and different from current items on the market. 

 

Here are some photos from the current catalog of products. You can see the catalogs are set up much of the same way with black and white photos.

Kenneth Lynch & Sons, Inc., Thinking Outside the Boxwood Kenneth Lynch & Sons, Inc., Thinking Outside the Boxwood

Their current catalog has beautiful cisterns that would great in formal spaces or used as garden planters. The catalog also includes cast stone and lead animal statues; deer, dogs, birds and the more exotic kangaroo or hippo.  

 

I would recommend the 1970s (or 60′s) book for any garden designer for creative reference. I found a few listed on eBay for anyone interested:

  • 1966 Garden Ornaments Catalog, by Kenneth Lynch & Sons – currently $50, Buy it Now.
  • 1961 Garden Ornaments Wholesale Catalog – Kenneth Lynch & Sons – Currently $45, Buy it Now
  • Garden Ornament an Encyclopedia from Kenneth Lynch & Sons – currently $16 (this is a bound book compared to my copy, and looks to have different images)

Here are links to the Kenneth Lynch & Sons company information. I was not able to find a lot of color photograph examples of their products nor have I ever used their products.

 

If any one is interested in the full article from The Saturday Evening Post, I can scan the article and send you a pdf. It was very entertaining and you appreciate all that Lynch accomplished in his life.

Get the Look: Rocca Civalieri

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Get the Look: Rocca Civalieri, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

 

An image from Giardino Segreto of this garden has been the cover of my GARDENS board on Pinterest for awhile. I see it so often I sometimes glance over it. However, current projects have been evaluating different plants against dark walls and went to search out more photos of this project. The design was completed for Rocca Civalieri, located at the Monferrato Hills in Italy. The design was the result of turning the one time summer sanctuary of Piedmontese nobles from the late Middle Ages and farm into a hotel, spa and convention center. Baietto Battiato Bianco were the architects for the project and Cristiana Ruspa of Giardino Segreto was the landscape architect. You will be able to tell at the number of photos on the project I included how inspiring I found the overall design.

 

Get the Look: Rocca Civalieri, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

This feature is from Armadillo Bar and is posted from July 2014, so shows the matured plants compared to the other photos of he project with dates in 2012 and earlier. (see the following photo for the change). Also I found the dark wall behind the plantings is created by pre-oxidized cooper in a stratified dark copper.

 

 

Get the Look: Rocca Civalieri, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

 

This is the same bed featured from Giardino Segreto at an earlier stage of the planting. This is the circular drive at the entrance of the hotel.  A construction photo from Idea Turisom shows the detail of the bed being edged in a non-oxidized copper (see below).

 

 

Get the Look: Rocca Civalieri, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

This photo from Idea Tursimo shows the construction of the front bed that also includes edging with non-treated copper.

 

Get the Look: Rocca Civalieri, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

Here is another construction photo of the bed with the copper addition prior to to the planting installation. Photo from Idea Tursimo.

 

Get the Look: Rocca Civalieri, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

Here is a final view of the driveway entrance completed. A detail the other photos did not showcase was transition to a paved hardscape closer to the building entrance from the gravel driveway.  Photo from Giardino Segreto.

 

The Rocca Cilvalieri includes an inner courtyard, which features a bleached wood square pergola structure. Many of the planting from the entrance are repeated here with the addition of climbing iceberg roses and clematis to provide shade.

Get the Look: Rocca Civalieri, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

The central pergola in the bright midday sun, providing the intended shade. Image from Armadillo Bar.

Get the Look: Rocca Civalieri, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

An alterantive view from Armadillo Bar of the courtyard area.

Get the Look: Rocca Civalieri, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

This photo feature the courtyard at a cooler light and younger plantings. Photo from Giardino Segreto.

Get the Look: Rocca Civalieri, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

My favorite detail is how the copper planters are enclosed by the stairs and the horizontal detail reflects the step’s treads. Photo from Giardino Segreto.

 

The last photo I want to share before we get into the plant and material break down is the aerial view provided by Copper Concepts. The highlighted portion showcases the area clad in the pre-oxidised copper. You can see the circular drive and the rectangular courtyard featured in the previous photos.

Get the Look: Rocca Civalieri, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

 

Here is a breakdown of the plants featured in the design with the hardscape materials. I want to note that Giardino Segreto provided the plant ids on their website and want to give credit to them for being open to share this information.

Get the Look: Rocca Civalieri, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

 

 

Links to purchase:

  • Artemisia arborescens ‘Powis Castle’ – Ball Seed
  • Miscanthus sinensis – Fine Gardening for image   PLEASE NOTE: - Miscanthus sinensis Anderss (or Japanese Silvergrass) this is on the National Park Service website as an invasive plant for the Mid-Atlantic region. 
  • Perovskia atriplicifolia – White Flower Farm
  • Verbena bonariensis – Monrovia 
  • Stipa tenuissima – Monrovia 

 

Here are my sources and credits for this article if you would like to read further:

 

 

Behind the Gardenista Garden Design

Before and After, G A R D E N S, Landscape Design, McCullough, My Work, New Albany, Ohio

As many of you know we are in a competition on the gardening website Gardenista.  The competition is drawing to a close here in a few days, August 8th.  I wanted to shed some more light on the garden that is in the competition.  This garden has been a labor of love for a number of years….every year we design and install a new project- that has lead to this point.  Over the years the client-relationship has turned to friendship and strengthens with every passing project- I could not stress this enough, this project could not have happened without the homeowner’s trust…….and their constant pushing me to be my best….I am truly so lucky!

This Ohio property celebrates the native forest and grass meadows found in the Midwest merged with the client’s love for modern and contemporary design.   Lush perennial borders and a productive vegetable garden help to merge the traditional and contemporary style of the home––building upon the surrounding hardwood forest and Midwest meadowlands  The design was commissioned after the homeowners had moved into their recently built Georgian home.  Frustrated by the initial landscape, I was asked to create a master plan to help blend the owner’s love for modern design and create a sustainable plan to manage the beautiful surrounding hardwood forest.  The goal was to create lush mixed borders, with year round interest, that transitioned between the classic Georgian architecture and the modern pool and pool house with distinctive paving and planting style.  In addition, restore managed native meadows that would frame the mowed lawn area and sculpted paths creating a rich tapestry of native species and habit for the indigenous fauna.

Please enjoy the pictorial tour of the garden!

2014-08-06_7-42-38

Behind the Gardenista Garden Design- McCullough's Landscape & Nursery, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

Behind the Gardenista Garden Design- McCullough's Landscape & Nursery, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

Behind the Gardenista Garden Design- McCullough's Landscape & Nursery, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

Behind the Gardenista Garden Design- McCullough's Landscape & Nursery, Thinking Outside the BoxwoodBehind the Gardenista Garden Design- McCullough's Landscape & Nursery, Thinking Outside the BoxwoodBehind the Gardenista Garden Design- McCullough's Landscape & Nursery, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

Behind the Gardenista Garden Design- McCullough's Landscape & Nursery, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

Behind the Gardenista Garden Design- McCullough's Landscape & Nursery, Thinking Outside the BoxwoodBehind the Gardenista Garden Design- McCullough's Landscape & Nursery, Thinking Outside the Boxwood Behind the Gardenista Garden Design- McCullough's Landscape & Nursery, Thinking Outside the Boxwood Behind the Gardenista Garden Design- McCullough's Landscape & Nursery, Thinking Outside the Boxwood Behind the Gardenista Garden Design- McCullough's Landscape & Nursery, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

Behind the Gardenista Garden Design- McCullough's Landscape & Nursery, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

Behind the Gardenista Garden Design- McCullough's Landscape & Nursery, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

Behind the Gardenista Garden Design- McCullough's Landscape & Nursery, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

Behind the Gardenista Garden Design- McCullough's Landscape & Nursery, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

Behind the Gardenista Garden Design- McCullough's Landscape & Nursery, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

Behind the Gardenista Garden Design- McCullough's Landscape & Nursery, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

Behind the Gardenista Garden Design- McCullough's Landscape & Nursery, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

Behind the Gardenista Garden Design- McCullough's Landscape & Nursery, Thinking Outside the Boxwood Behind the Gardenista Garden Design- McCullough's Landscape & Nursery, Thinking Outside the Boxwood Behind the Gardenista Garden Design- McCullough's Landscape & Nursery, Thinking Outside the Boxwood Behind the Gardenista Garden Design- McCullough's Landscape & Nursery, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

Behind the Gardenista Garden Design- McCullough's Landscape & Nursery, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

Behind the Gardenista Garden Design- McCullough's Landscape & Nursery, Thinking Outside the Boxwood Behind the Gardenista Garden Design- McCullough's Landscape & Nursery, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

Behind the Gardenista Garden Design- McCullough's Landscape & Nursery, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

 

Behind the Gardenista Garden Design- McCullough's Landscape & Nursery, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

Behind the Gardenista Garden Design- McCullough's Landscape & Nursery, Thinking Outside the BoxwoodBehind the Gardenista Garden Design- McCullough's Landscape & Nursery, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

Behind the Gardenista Garden Design- McCullough's Landscape & Nursery, Thinking Outside the BoxwoodBehind the Gardenista Garden Design- McCullough's Landscape & Nursery, Thinking Outside the Boxwood Behind the Gardenista Garden Design- McCullough's Landscape & Nursery, Thinking Outside the Boxwood Behind the Gardenista Garden Design- McCullough's Landscape & Nursery, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

Behind the Gardenista Garden Design- McCullough's Landscape & Nursery, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

Behind the Gardenista Garden Design- McCullough's Landscape & Nursery, Thinking Outside the Boxwood Behind the Gardenista Garden Design- McCullough's Landscape & Nursery, Thinking Outside the Boxwood Behind the Gardenista Garden Design- McCullough's Landscape & Nursery, Thinking Outside the Boxwood Behind the Gardenista Garden Design- McCullough's Landscape & Nursery, Thinking Outside the Boxwood Behind the Gardenista Garden Design- McCullough's Landscape & Nursery, Thinking Outside the Boxwood Behind the Gardenista Garden Design- McCullough's Landscape & Nursery, Thinking Outside the Boxwood Behind the Gardenista Garden Design- McCullough's Landscape & Nursery, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

 

Recent Garden Projects:

The garden is ever evolving- the spring of 2014 was a busy one.  The traditional Georgian home received a major touch of modern by adding a beautifully minimal glass solarium which inserts the home into the garden.  Below, you can see how this bluestone and sod terrace was transformed into the the new modern space.   Some the of highlights include block boxwood plantings, steel / gravel staircase, large drifts of Deschampsia cepsitosa and assorted Eryngium, and lastly a low alpine border. The concepts and discussion started last fall and progressed through the winter.    Below and can get some insight to the conceptual layouts- you can also notice how I use my Pinterest inspiration in my concepts.

Like I said, this project is ever evolving- this fall we are under taking an ambitious cantilevered deck which will over look the ravine which runs across the back of the property…..believe me, I will update with the progress.

Behind the Gardenista Garden Design- McCullough's Landscape & Nursery, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

Behind the Gardenista Garden Design- McCullough's Landscape & Nursery, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

Behind the Gardenista Garden Design- McCullough's Landscape & Nursery, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

 

Behind the Gardenista Garden Design- McCullough's Landscape & Nursery, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

gardenista_01

 

gardenista_02

Behind the Gardenista Garden Design- McCullough's Landscape & Nursery, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

Behind the Gardenista Garden Design- McCullough's Landscape & Nursery, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

Behind the Gardenista Garden Design- McCullough's Landscape & Nursery, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

Behind the Gardenista Garden Design- McCullough's Landscape & Nursery, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

Behind the Gardenista Garden Design- McCullough's Landscape & Nursery, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

Behind the Gardenista Garden Design- McCullough's Landscape & Nursery, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

Behind the Gardenista Garden Design- McCullough's Landscape & Nursery, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

 

 

Annual trip to Detroit

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Last weekend I made my semi-annual trip up to the northern suburbs of Detroit for work and inspiration reboot (there are lots of photos to share). I have posted about this trip before, but I find new inspiration each time I go. Detroit is in the news mainly about the post apocalyptic state and mass exodus of the city proper residents. However those who can invest in the city and outside in the suburbs, really are investing, building and taking pride in their area. I am not one to go into the politics of the situation, but I do advocate visiting Detroit. We ate very well, explored very different areas and met with passionate gardeners. The Pure Michigan commercials really are true.

 

One of the main reasons for the timing of our trip was to take part of Detroit Garden Work’s annual Garden Cruise benefiting Greening of Detroit. I believe Deborah Silver and the folks at Branch and Detroit Garden Works are true artists, craftsmen and really just pure genius. When we drive around, you can spot Deborah’s work instantly in either container design or the form she creates in a garden. I really wanted the chance to tour her gardens from more than the street, and the pleasure of touring her own garden at home. There were six gardens featured, some all by Deborah others were a combo of her and the home owners.  Here are photos from the gardens on the tour:

 

Annual Trip to Detroit,  Detroit Garden Work's Garden Cruise, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

The containers are Branch Studio designed and were planted well over 10 feet tall. The photo does not do the scale justice.

 

Annual Trip to Detroit,  Detroit Garden Work's Garden Cruise, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

 

The next house on the tour was a smaller Tudor style with a silver front yard and pure green structural back yard.

Annual Trip to Detroit,  Detroit Garden Work's Garden Cruise, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

This home featured a front bed planted with three pure silver plants, that provided a calm palette with movement and texture. See the photos below for the whole layered design.

Annual Trip to Detroit,  Detroit Garden Work's Garden Cruise, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

Annual Trip to Detroit,  Detroit Garden Work's Garden Cruise, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

The home also featured branch studio window boxes planted with:

Annual Trip to Detroit,  Detroit Garden Work's Garden Cruise, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

 

Annual Trip to Detroit,  Detroit Garden Work's Garden Cruise, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

The sphere and water features are both designed by Branch Studio via Detroit Garden Works.

 

Another house on the tour featured an elliptical shaped garden and a border of perennials- but the true show stoppers were the twin fountains flanking the central walkway.

Annual Trip to Detroit,  Detroit Garden Work's Garden Cruise, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

 

Our final stop on the tour was Deborah’s home. The show stopping feature were the home’s original containers (featured below) and her bubbling water feature. Annual Trip to Detroit,  Detroit Garden Work's Garden Cruise, Thinking Outside the Boxwood Annual Trip to Detroit,  Detroit Garden Work's Garden Cruise, Thinking Outside the Boxwood Annual Trip to Detroit,  Detroit Garden Work's Garden Cruise, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

Annual Trip to Detroit,  Detroit Garden Work's Garden Cruise, Thinking Outside the BoxwoodAnnual Trip to Detroit,  Detroit Garden Work's Garden Cruise, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

Annual Trip to Detroit,  Detroit Garden Work's Garden Cruise, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

 

Since our trip was to pick up some containers from Detroit Garden Works, Here are some photos from the store. They create and import some of the finest garden containers and decor. Always worth a visit to see the unique.

Annual Trip to Detroit,  Detroit Garden Works, Thinking Outside the Boxwood Annual Trip to Detroit,  Detroit Garden Works, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

 

This water feature was insane. It was created by welding all the individual rods by men swapping every 20 minutes to ensure a random pattern.

Annual Trip to Detroit,  Detroit Garden Works, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

 

We also made our first visit to Urban Detroit Gardens and Fleur Detroit which is just down the street from Detroit Garden Works. Honestly kicked ourselves for never stopping on previous trips. The shop blends the entire garden lifestyle with outdoor, interiors and flowers/events.

Annual Trip to Detroit, Urban Detroit Gardens and Fleur Detroit , Thinking Outside the Boxwood Annual Trip to Detroit, Urban Detroit Gardens and Fleur Detroit , Thinking Outside the Boxwood Annual Trip to Detroit, Urban Detroit Gardens and Fleur Detroit , Thinking Outside the Boxwood

 

Our Trip also included a visit to Cranbrook Educational Community Campus in Bloomfield Hills and Greenfield Village in Dearborn. The sprawling Cranbrook campus includes k-9 schools, collage and two museums.

Annual Trip to Detroit, Cranbrook Educational Community Campus , Thinking Outside the Boxwood A water feature at the Cranbrook Art Museum. There was so much more to take photos of, but we had rambunctious kids, so taking photos was limited.

 

Annual Trip to Detroit, Cranbrook Educational Community Campus , Thinking Outside the Boxwood

This was the Corten landform at the entrance of the campus. Corten has yet to make its appearance in Columbus, but you see it all round in Detroit’s landscapes.

 

Below is are garden at an 1600′s English cottage at Greenfield Village. We spent a full five hours touring the buildings, playing and riding the train. What Henry Ford created was almost like the Disney World for historical life. Buildings from across America and England were transported to the village to compile a 300 year view into working and living experiences.

Annual Trip to Detroit, Greenfield Village , Thinking Outside the BoxwoodAnnual Trip to Detroit, Greenfield Village , Thinking Outside the Boxwood

 

So there was our Trip to Detroit in a 20 or so photos. I could add a few more must see places, so if anyone is interested in my complete list of places to see while in the area send me an email or comment. I feel like an unofficial ambassador for Southeast Michigan.

 

In Bloom – July 21

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First, want to ask for a favor and your vote for best Professional Landscape on Gardenista’s Considered Design Awards. It was a surprise on Sunday to hear we were a finalist and are a few days behind on voting. I would greatly appreciate your daily vote here:

Gardenista Considered Design Awards. 

 

Now to this week’s In Bloom post. To mix things up this week, we are featuring the flowers in bloom as boutonnieres made by our resident floral designer at McCullough’s Landscape- great job Steve!  Both of these boutonnieres feature thistles from previous weeks with additional foliage now previously used. The benefit of the thistles is the heads are long term beauties in the garden, hence their feature for the past few weeks.

 

In Bloom - July 21, Thinking Outside the Boxwood- Plant Id at http://thinkingoutsidetheboxwood.com/ In Bloom - July 21, Thinking Outside the Boxwood- Plant Id at http://thinkingoutsidetheboxwood.com/

Top: Erygium alphium, Erygium yuccifolium (foliage) and Echeveria ‘Lola’

Bottom: Erygium yuccifolium, Foeniculum vulgare (Bronze Fennel) Plectranthus ‘Cerveza n Lime’

See the blooms from the previous two weeks:

July 7

July 14

 

I see that my past three posts all feature arrangements, so need to get back on the design posts more to come this week feature ideas and inspiration from my annual trip to Detroit.

 

In Bloom – July 14

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Last week I shared the first arrangement of blooms found in the garden and nursery.  This week’s arrangement is more dense and rich blooms compared to the previous’ wispy and organic feeling. Even though these flowers were all blooming last week, I must be in a darker mood this week to select over last week.

In Bloom - July 14, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

In Bloom - July 14, Thinking Outside the Boxwood In Bloom - July 14, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

 

 

In Bloom - July 14, Thinking Outside the Boxwood, Bloom ID at thinkingoutsidetheboxwood.com

 

Left to right: Row 1: Dahlia ‘Queen of the Night’, Monarda didyma ‘Jacob Cline’, Row 2: Cotinus coggygia ‘Royal Purple’, Eryngium planum ‘Blue Hobbit’, Sanguisorba officinalis ‘Morning Select’

 

 

In Bloom – July 7

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During the spring we appreciate every flower bloom as the hellebores lead to tulips and daffodils, and by the time the forsythia is done blooming we have so many blooms we can forget to appreciate the weekly progression. I am trying to sit back and really appreciate what each week brings in the garden and make arrangements of the blooms to share each week. I shared these arrangements a few times last year, but plan on keeping the series going for as long as I have blooms to share.

 

This week the arrangement features a collection of plants that I appreciate for their striking round heads and lack of floral petals. The distinctive shape of these plants make them great for floral arrangements when arranged with softer petals, but also work great together.

 

In Bloom - July 7, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

 

Here are some detailed photos of the arrangement:

In Bloom - July 7, Thinking Outside the BoxwoodIn Bloom - July 7, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

 

All these flowers were gathered from our display gardens and in the greenhouse. I selected to grow some for perennial gardens and others for selling in floral markets so it is a random mix of flowers. Here is a breakdown of the individual flowers that complied the arrangement: Listed left to right- Row 1: Rudbeckia occidentalis ‘Green Wizard’, Echinops bannaticus ‘Blue Glow’, Echinops bannaticus ‘Star Frost’.  Row 2: Liatris spicata ‘Kobold’, Erygium alphium, Erygium yuccifolium. Row 3: Allium sphaerocephalon, Combination arrangement.

In Bloom - July 7, Thinking Outside the Boxwood- Plant IDs at thinkingoutsidetheboxwood.com

 

Keep checking back each Monday to see how the blooms and arrangements change through the seasons.

The Benefits of an Edge

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Sometimes borders are a good thing and that includes in the garden. Edges help provide a transition between elements and can help contain gravel, mulch and turf from spreading. Besides its use for providing a barrier, edging provides an additional design element and should be considered detail.

The Benefits of an Edge, Thinking Outside the Boxwood, Metal edging w/ Green Velvet Boxwood (Buxus 'Green Velvet') and Lady's Mantle (Alchemilla mollis 'Thiller')

Metal edging along a gravel pathway.

 

 

The Benefits of an Edge, Thinking Outside the Boxwood, Brick Edging

 Bricks on edge between turf lawn and a perennial garden. 

 

Where and How to Edge: Edging is used in areas of loose stone to prevent from spreading into turf or beds, such as walkways, driveways and patio spaces. It can also be used to provide an edge along turf to prevent the spreading of grass into plant beds. Common materials used include brick, cut stone, slab stone and metal. Below is a visual ID of four major edging types in use.

 

The Benefits of an Edge, Thinking Outside the Boxwood, Edging by Type

 

The Benefits of an Edge, Thinking Outside the Boxwood, Metal edging separating pea gravel and turf

 Metal edging used to separate gravel bed and turf.  

 

Edging Problems: In areas where there is freezing and thawing, some edging material will heave out of the ground and will need to be periodically re-set. Edging is not a 100% foolproof barrier, gravel and grass will cross the line and will require maintenance. Also if the wrong gravel type is used or layered too thick, the barrier will not provide the intended function.

The Benefits of an Edge, Thinking Outside the Boxwood, Metal edging on a green roof in Columbus, Ohio, USA

Metal edging along gravel path on a green roof. 

 

The Benefits of an Edge, Thinking Outside the Boxwood, Metal edging creating a meandering path

Metal edging along a gravel path into a perennial garden. 

 

When Not to Using Edging: I don’t typically use edging around flower/perennial beds. I prefer to use a technique that includes a deep trench surrounding the bed. I use a sharp flat spade cut to make minor adjustments in the shape and insuring separation of the turf and bed.

Also please stay away from those plastic edging. If you use the method above you will have better result of keep beds shaped and materials contained. I cannot think of too many cases where plastic is ever the best solution in the garden.

 

(All photos from work by McCullough’s Landscape & Nursery)

 

Kurt Bluemel – Horticultural Royalty Remembered

G A R D E N S, gardening, Gardens, Landscape Design, Piet Oudolf | Tagged , , , , , , , , , ,

Last week I received a copy of Kurt Bluemel’s obituary, the Grass King, pioneer of ornamental grasses. (Read the obituary here from the Baltimore Sun). Last year at the Perennial Plant Association symposium in Vancouver I was on a garden tour with Kurt….. While touring a botanical garden he corrected the botanical name of grass for a master gardener.  The master gardener stood his ground and insisted he correct (poor guy didn’t have a clue), Kurt bluntly asked, “Do you know who I am?” The few of us who witnessed the interaction tried not to burst out in laughter- the master gardener underestimated the tourist- who we all knew as the Grass King and the unequivocal expert on ornamental grasses. While on your evening walks this week, when you see the tall plumes or blades of an ornamental grass, think of Kurt and be thankful for his passion and ethic in spreading ornamental grasses and the New American Garden Style. To see and purchase from the library of ornamental grasses Kurt curated visit www.kurtbluemel.com. There is also a wonderful tribute on the site written by Allen Bush for Kurt’s 75th birthday (here). In honor of Kurt Bluemel, here is a selection of a few of my favorite grasses.

 

Below is Piet Oudolf’s private garden, Hummelo, which bodes hundreds of grasses that catch the light and create the scene on this summer morning when I was visiting.Hummelo, Piet Oudolf's Private Garden: Kurt Bluemel - Horticultural Royalty Remembered -Thinking Outside the Boxwood,

A mass planting of one of my favorite grasses, Deschampsia cespitosa ‘Goldtau’, at the revolutionary garden of historical dutch garden designer Mien Ruys in Dedemsvaart, Holland

Deschampsia cespitosa  'Goldtau' at the garden of Mien Ruys : Kurt Bluemel - Horticultural Royalty Remembered -Thinking Outside the Boxwood,

Miscanthus ‘Cabaret’ with Cotinus ‘Velvet Cloak’ on one of my projects in New Albany, Ohio.

Miscanthus sinensis 'Cabaret' with Cotinus : Kurt Bluemel - Horticultural Royalty Remembered -Thinking Outside the Boxwood,

A huge drift of Hakonechloa macra ‘Aureola’ paired with Japanese Painted Fern in New Albany, OH.

Hakonechloa macra 'Aureola' : Kurt Bluemel - Horticultural Royalty Remembered -Thinking Outside the Boxwood,

Calamagrostis × acutiflora ‘Karl Foerster’ and Acorus gramineus ‘Oborozuki’ play an important part of creating contrast and in both texture and color in this modern perennial garden.

New Albany, Ohio Private Garden by Nick McCullough: Kurt Bluemel - Horticultural Royalty Remembered -Thinking Outside the Boxwood,

Strategically placed Calamagrostis × acutiflora ‘Karl Foerster’ weave the garden together at Piet Oudolf’s garden outside his studio.

Hummelo, Piet Oudolf's Private Garden: Kurt Bluemel - Horticultural Royalty Remembered -Thinking Outside the Boxwood,

Hakonechloa macra ‘Aureola’ line the path of the modern display garden at Appeltern (De Tuinen van Appeltern) in Holland the contrast of the fine foliage and the board cobbles and hedging caught my eye.

Hakonechloa macra 'Aureola' : Kurt Bluemel - Horticultural Royalty Remembered -Thinking Outside the Boxwood,