What to expect at the Association of Professional Landscape Designers (APLD) Conference

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After returning from the APLD Boston conference, I reflected about how the conference was beneficial to me as a designer. With no shortage of trade shows, garden tours and conferences to attend each year, I wanted to share some insight into the conference and my personal experience to help anyone on the fence with attending.

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This year the conference was in Boston, MA, last year it was in Santa Fe, NM and next year is in Toronto.  My comments below follow the structure of both past conferences, but with images from Boston. You can see images from the Santa Fe tours I posted before HERE.  In my following posts I will share images from the Boston conference garden tours. I have so many I need to work on editing to the best ones, but this post gives you a sampling of the garden tour locations.

 

The conference is broken down into two main buckets; speakers/educational/panels and tours. I am adding a third section for networking, since it can be forgotten benefit out side of CEUs when reviewing the agenda. There are around 100+ attendees over the course of the event with some staying the whole time and others for just the tours or speakers/courses. And with a conference that size, there are not a lot of extra bells and whistles.

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SPEAKERS/CLASSES/PANELS

The conference portion of speakers, classes and panels takes place inside a hotel conference space which keeps everything in one central location. The Conference (counting pre and post) runs five days. I am not sure how long this link will live, but HERE is a breakdown of the schedule this year. With a pre-conference events on Thursday and the kick off with the in the classroom conference including six different sessions. Below is a breakdown of the conference topics:

  • Opening Keynote: The Art of the Makeover – Reinventing Existing Landscapes with Patrick Chasse, ASLA
  • Designing with Natives with Travis Beck, Director of Horticulture, Mt. Cuba Center
  • Quenching Heat, Humidity & Drought: Gardens that Dazzle – Withstanding the Dog Days & Onward with Warren Leach, Landscape Horticulturist and owner  Tranquil Lake Nursery.
  • Expose Yourself! How to feature your work locally, regionally and nationally
  • Place Making – Designing for Place through Customer Engagement with Garth Woodruff, APLD Assistant Professor Andrews University
  • Closing Keynote: The Designer’s Way: Creating Gardens and Lives of Beauty and Meaning with Julie Moir Messervy.

I spoke along with three other designers in a pre-conference panel about growing and expanding your business, which was a marathon, 3 hour, non-stop discussion about how we are running our business. It was a great discussion, and I hope there are more of these types of panels in future conferences. However see my next bullet point on networking.

 

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NETWORKING:

Most beneficial element of the conference for me is always the networking with fellow designers. No two designers have the same firm structure, career path or plant palette. However, everyone is open to talking about the good and bad of the business and giving as much advice and experiences as possible. The time on the buses, during break sessions at dinners and hotel bar drinks – I have had the most impact on my professional career from the networking during those moments. It was through this networking time I have joined a group of other Design | Build | Maintain companies across the country for monthly calls sharing business insights.  I think this is a factor that is overlooked in considering a conference, but again is so valuable to professionals.

 

What to expect at the Association of Professional Landscape Designers (APLD) Conference from Boston 2017 - More at thinkingoutsidetheboxwood.com

 

THE GARDEN TOURS:

The APLD garden tours are scouted by local APLD members, and majority include private homes that are infrequently opened for tours. Given the group are all gardeners, home owners know the group will treat the space with respect and care. There are two days of tours, which the closing session and awards at the end of the final day. I would not let the location of the conference stop you if not aligned to your local environment. Last year the conference was in Santa Fe, and while the area has very unique terrain and water needs and completely different from Central Ohio. However the use of materials, planting combinations/patterns and incorporation of artwork was inspiring and relevant to me as a designer (Again see my photos HERE). Actually maybe more so since made me look at things completely differently than my normal environment. Also, as you can see in many of my following posts, getting photos without people is not a problem. You also have fellow experts around you if there are any questions, someone will know the plant, tried the method or how to maintain.

 

 

What to expect at the Association of Professional Landscape Designers (APLD) Conference from Boston 2017 - More at thinkingoutsidetheboxwood.com

COSTS, PACKING and QUICKTIPS:

I know it is a financial Investment to attend the conference, and I would budget with conference, hotel, food and travel to cost in the range of $3,000 – $3,500 for five days. You can save on hotel rooms if you are willing to room with someone, you spend very little time in your room between tours and the classroom time. It is a packed agenda, expect to leave the room around 8 and return around 9/10 pm.

Here is my quick packing list:

  • Camera and charger and a cellphone charging cube
  • Hat, sunscreen and sunglasses
  • Rain Coat
  • Business cards – make sure all your social handles are listed
  • Note Book, pen and traveling bag for the bus
  • Light Snacks and water for the bus rides

Other tips: Spend as little time in your room as possible. Go to dinners with attendees, meet up for morning coffee runs. Ask questions, lots of questions. Research the host city for additional spots to visit. Drop pins during garden tours to visit areas again.

What to expect at the Association of Professional Landscape Designers (APLD) Conference from Boston 2017 - More at thinkingoutsidetheboxwood.com

 

I know it requires a financial investment to attend a conference. I hope this helps give you some details on what you can expect and really what the end pay off can be. The APLD conference next year is in Toronto, Canada September 13-17. If you have any questions leading up to the event, please feel free to message me, I am happy to jump on the phone and talk.

Sites for Great RHS Chelsea Flower Show Recaps

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Hard to believe that The RHS Chelsea Flower show has already closed and all the beautiful gardens are being torn down. Since I have yet be able to make the trip across the pond to see the gardens myself, I have gotten good at finding others that have for all the best images and videos. Since I am sure there are others like me looking for the best perspective to the show, I wanted to share my sources. Please if you have any sources please pass long, either videos, blogs or articles. Hopefully soon, I will be able to share my own experience until then I will continue to live vicariously through others. (Sorry for the lack of photos, but I clicking through the links you will not be disappointed)

 

ShootGardening.co.uk

Shoot provides photos and the plant breakdowns for all the show gardens. New this year they provide photographic photos of the plant IDs to help you identify the plants in the gardens and understand how they play with the others with spread, height and texture. This detailed information is great for anyone that needs help ID-ing the plant they like. You can also go back in the archives to previous Chelsea and Hampton Court Flower shows.

 

Preparing for the RHS Chelsea Flower Show with James Alexander-Sinclair 

I love anything behind the scenes, and the videos James Alexander-Sinclair did for creating the Zoe Ball Listening Garden provide that on the fly behind the scenes commentary. The second video shows how they tested the sound vibrations in the water, which is just beautiful and you will never understand from looking at the finished photos alone. James has a series of videos called The View from Here… which are also fun watching.

 

RHS 3D Garden Views

For the best quality photos, no one beats the RHS’s own website. For the show gardens they even provide 3D tours, allowing you to experience walking through the spaces experiencing all the different angles. The RHS also has great videos of the whole process leading up to the big reveals that are fun to watch. The link provided is to the landing page of Charlotte Harris’ garden for the Royal Bank of Canada. HERE is another great video with Charlotte talking about the elements that influenced her garden design.

 

The Frustrated Gardener 

For amazing personal photographs, I love the posts from the Frustrated Gardener. The images are beautifully presented on the page, allowing you to focus on each one’s attributes. Beyond the Chelsea articles, this is an amazing blog to add to your reading list for a great garden design perspective.

 

How to add Dahlias to Your Garden

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As peony madness fades with the summer heat, it’s time to hail the beauty of dahlias. Dahlias are an easy addition to any existing garden and offer a large range of colors, petal shapes and sizes to fit your desires.  Also, planting a tuber around the frost free date will provide you with beautiful blooms in July and August, a quick, and bountiful payoff not often common in the garden.  There is a bit of maintenance of digging and storing tubers over the winter in very mild climates like zone 9, but you should have no fear in planting these in your garden and will have a great time selecting the varieties to add.

Dahlia 'Cafe au Lait', Cotinus coggygria 'Royal Purple'- How to add Dahlias to Your Garden, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

How to add Dahlias to Your Garden, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

 

 

 

WHERE TO PLANT:

Since you can add tubers to an existing garden, you have lots of options to place dahlias. Look around your home to see if you have any of the locations below that meet the full sun and well-drained soil requirements, if you do then move on to selecting the varieties you want to order!

 

– In a perennial border, or in an existing bed at your home. Looking at the existing foundational plantings around your house, see if there are spaces you can place a few dahlias.  The taller varieties are great in the background or mixed near taller plants, while place some of lower varieties in the front.

How to add Dahlias to Your Garden, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

This is a client’s front yard perennial bed. It is located behind a boxwood hedge and is filled with a mixture of blue/purple perennials. We have a few containers spaced through the bed to add seasonal color, along with these cafe au lait dahlias.  

 

 

– In a container. Anyone with a front porch, stoop, balcony or patio that gets full sun can do this option.  Use the taller varieties (30-40 inches) as the “thriller” in your container.  Or fill an entire container with the shorter varieties (20-24 inches).

How to add Dahlias to Your Garden, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

This is a garden created by Deborah Silver from Detroit Garden Works I visited a few years ago with the Association of Professional Landscape Designer (APLD). Deborah added dahlias with other perennial and annual flowers in these large containers. You can also do in smaller container, with 1-2 of each plant variety. 

 

 

– With your Vegetables. Pollinators love dahlias and so will your vegetables. Since you are already in with the vegetables watering, feeding and harvesting, this is an easy location to add some dahlias. You can add these along the edges our outside the fence line. This is a great place for the taller varieties.

How to add Dahlias to Your Garden, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

Here is a client’s vegetable garden which features a pollinator and cutting garden  inside the vegetable garden. To the left of these dahlias there is a swing and the dining table in the center allows the homeowners to enjoy the blooms while they are still in the garden. 

   How to add Dahlias to Your Garden, Thinking Outside the Boxwood  

Here is a harvest of both the dahlias and vegetables from a client’s garden. Fresh food and flowers for dinner is a great combo. 

 

HOW TO PLANT:

The best place to plant is in a location that gets full sun and well-drained soil. Since you are planting these for the blooms, provide lots of organic matter when planting and weekly feeding once buds appear for the best blooms.

 

How to add Dahlias to Your Garden, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

SELECTING THE VARIETY:

I mentioned earlier there is a wide variety of distinctive features to dahlias, giving you lots of options in color, petal shape and size to select. Two great sites for selecting which colors, shapes or varieties you like are the following;

The National Dahlia Collection – This site provides you with a vast listing of dahlias that helps you see the options in shapes and colors. Broken down into; ball, cactus, collerette, decorative, dwarf, pompon, semi cactus, waterlily, miscellaneous.  –  https://nationaldahliacollection.co.uk/selecting-dahlias

Floret Flowers – A specialty cut flower grower extraordinaire in the pacific northwest, she is a big fan of dahlias, and shares all favorites with successes and failures in beautiful flowers.

 

 

HOW TO BUY:

Since dahlias are typically planted from tubers, online ordering is very easy and offers a large selection. You will want to time your ordering to get the best selection – think early January to place a preorder for spring shipping. But you can start pre-shopping suppliers now for your selected varieties and confirm when they expect to start taking dahlia orders.

 

If you are a bit more impatient to get blooms this year – you can check at your local garden center to see if they have some established plants growing for you can transplant into your garden. However, at this point it will be slim pickings for the varieties (if any), but worth a try.

 

 

 

April to do – Plant Sales

Advice

Happy first day of April! March went by quickly, but that is generally true for every month in Ohio expect for February. March went by with cleaning up and prepping gardens for Aprils showers and warmer weather. We do some planting in April, but the frost in Ohio makes it difficult on some plant varieties. Another great thing for gardeners to do in April is visit local garden club, arboretum and plant society sales. These are the best resource for unique, native or difficult to find plants.  I posted last year on this topic. I don’t want to be redundant, but this year I am ahead of the major sales so want to share some more tips and remind you (and myself) to mark your calendars.

 

WHEN:  Depending on the part of the country, lot of the sales start in April, run into May with a few repeating again in the fall. Last year I visited the Chadwick Arboretum (May 7-9) and the Granville Garden Club’s Daffodil Sale (April 18-19). I missed the Dawes Arboretum Sale (May 16).

 

HOW TO FIND: Start with checking the websites of local Arboretums and Conservatories. Here is a database search by ZIP CODE from the American Horticulture Society. Another great resource would be to check local master gardeners or garden clubs. Here is a link (also from the American Horticulture Society for Master Garden clubs by State. And here is a link to find garden clubs in your state too, via the National Garden Clubs website.  You can also do a good old Google search for “Plant sale” and your area’s name and see the results.

 

AT THE SALE TIPS:

  • These sales often have wagons you can use, but if its a popular sale (like Trade Secrets) it might help to bring your own wagon. However please be courteous while pulling in crowds, I have received (and given) a few bruised shins in the past.
  • Plants are grouped by type, seller or both. Know the site conditions you are looking to fill (sun/shade/soil/water), since this will help you narrow down where to look and save you for making a purchase that is not successful in your garden.
  • Use your phone to search images and care information on plants you are not knowledgeable. Often these are cuttings from someone’s personal garden or the arboretum so don’t include those informational tags at nurseries, just the plant name. And there are tons of knowledgeable plant people around so ask them questions.

 

IF YOU MISS THE SALES: Don’t worry, go to your local nursery as early as possible to get the best selection. If you purchase a plant before your frost free date, protect the them with old sheets at night when there is a potential for frost.

 

I hope everyone is able to get out to at least one sale this year, or like me try to visit as many as you can.

15 Fresh Greens for Holiday Decorating

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The week after Thanksgiving is a rush to get our clients homes decorated for the holiday season. Even though the week is busy, we look forward to flexing our festive creative muscles. I shared photos of a few projects on instagram throughout the week (NickMccland),if you want a preview. There were questions about the types of greens we used and thought I would share a list of all the different types of fresh greenery we use as a info graphic for quick reference. These are the greens that work well in Ohio’s December climate or we use only indoor (such as pepperberry). There are infinite combinations you could make with these greens, highlighted with ribbon, ornaments, pinecones and branches.

 

15 Fresh Greens for Holiday Decorating Containers, Wreaths or Garlands from Thinking Outside the boxwood

 

 

One of our favorite tricks is using a variety of these fresh greens tucked in a standard Frasier Fir wreath or graland. The fir provides a dense base for tucking in other greens for distinctive texture and color. You can purchase greens from florists or take clippings from your own backyard. The dense fir wreath will hold the green’s branches with in the existing wiring, or use paddle wire to secure to the frame. This trick provides you with a nice fresh wreath, that is unique to only your home without the custom made cost or time.

 

 

 

 

Seasonal Color for Your Mood

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I am an advocate container and seasonal color for the ability to change your homes’ mood from season to season and introduce elements that provide a twist to the story of your landscape. This home in historical German Village is a great showcase how seasonal color can provide serious (and noncommittal) impact. The front yard space is about 7 feet deep and is planted with low, monochromatic and textural plantings. This was done intentionally to place the focus the window boxes and containers which are replanted four times a year with annuals and perennials. This frequent change allows us to change the mood and tones of the garden with the seasons and homeowners’ humor.

Summer 2014 – Color Explosion 

Seasonal Color for Your Mood, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

Our color expert, Steve, and I created the combo for the windows to showcase an explosion of color. As you look at the house the two window boxes flank a central planter that is plant with Sterlitzia nicolai and Ipomea ‘Illusion Emerald Lace’.  The containers were kept simple with just two species because the window boxes behind were the real show in this case.

Seasonal Color for Your Mood, Thinking Outside the Boxwood Coleus ‘Dark Chocolate’, Lantana ‘Luscious Lemonade’, Begonia bolivensis ‘Waterfall Encanto Orange’,  Setcreasea pallida ‘Purple Heart’, and Dichondra argentea ‘Emerald Falls’, Seasonal Color for Your Mood, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

In this pair of window boxes you can see the amount of color and texture that is billowing over the edges.  Plant Identification (Starting from the top down) Coleus ‘Dark Chocolate’, Lantana ‘Luscious Lemonade’, Begonia bolivensis ‘Waterfall Encanto Orange’,  Setcreasea pallida ‘Purple Heart’, and Dichondra argentea ‘Emerald Falls’

 

Fall 2013 – Dark & Moody 

As we moved into fall the planters were planted in a monochromatic scheme of blue and purples.  Redbor Kale (Brassica oleracea ‘Redbor’ and Medusa Ornamental Pepper (Capsicum annuum) were used alongside pansies to add some fall flair.

 

Seasonal Color for Your Mood, Thinking Outside the BoxwoodSeasonal Color for Your Mood, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

Looking at the planter with Redbor Kale, Medusa Peppers and Silver Scroll Heuchera and Setcreasea pallida ‘Purple Heart’

 

Winter 2013: Extened greens

Adding Winter containers are normally the most appreciated in Ohio when most landscapes are brown, grey and dull green.  Adding lights and hits of color always brings a welcomig impact that can stay long past the traditional Christmas decorations. The planters are filled with a Fraser Fir greenery, Southern Magnolia, Leyland cypress and scarlet curly willow.

 Fraser Fir greenery, Southern Magnolia, Leyland cypress and scarlet curly willow, Seasonal Color for Your Mood, Thinking Outside the Boxwood  Fraser Fir greenery, Southern Magnolia, Leyland cypress and eucalyptus:  Seasonal Color for Your Mood, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

Looking at the front door we also draped the entry with a lush garland to welcome holiday guests and passersby. The garland and wreath at the front and embellished with eucalyptus, magnolia and Leyland  cypress  to tie in with the window boxes and planters.

Kenneth Lynch & Sons, Inc.

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The other weekend my father-in-law gifted me with a copy of Kenneth Lynch & Son’s Garden Ornaments catalog from the 1970s. It is 176 pages of garden furniture, ornaments, containers, fountains, and statues made in cast stone, iron and lead. Tucked inside was a reprinted article from the September, 1951 issue of The Saturday Evening Post about the company founder, Kenneth Lynch. Trained as a blacksmith, Lynch was known for his work in restoring and recreating metal armor and motto “if its made of metal, Kenneth Lynch can make it.” He expanded his design offering from purchasing the cast off molds, dies and patterns from other metal smiths marginal lines.

Kenneth Lynch & Sons, Inc., Thinking Outside the Boxwood

On the left is my 1970s catalog. On the right is the catalog/book I received when I contacted Kenneth Lynch & Sons for a copy of their current catalog. There are some products that are listed in both, but both feature items not included in the other.  If you are interested in their products you really need to request a catalog or download the PDF version. The website does not provide great photo examples of their work outside the catalog. 

 

The Saturday Evening Post article gave a great framework on the company’s history and transformation. It includes the great lesson to always say yes and have a “can do attitude,” you never know where that will take you. My favorite anadote is how he had a police officer help him steal a one of a kind sample bench for the 1939-40 World’s Fair so he could copy measurements and make molds to help win the work fabricating the 800 benches needed for the fair. Also, he did the work within the two week deadline.

Kenneth Lynch & Sons, Inc., Thinking Outside the Boxwood

Here is the drawings for the Worlds Fair Bench, which is also used in New York City Parks. If interested you can still order this bench design. 

 

Even if you are not thinking of purchasing from the company, the catalogs give you great inspiration for design work and containers. Here are some detailed shots from inside the catalog of favorite pages.

Kenneth Lynch & Sons, Inc., Thinking Outside the Boxwood

A lot of these tables do not appear in the current catalog, but I like the legs on the wrought iron legs. Simple design without a lot of extra flourish. 

 

Kenneth Lynch & Sons, Inc., Thinking Outside the Boxwood

I gather planters were not a favorite product since there were just a few pages of containers. What they do offer are a lot of different shapes and scale. 

 

Kenneth Lynch & Sons, Inc., Thinking Outside the Boxwood

Showcase of the detailed banning options for lead containers. 

 

Kenneth Lynch & Sons, Inc., Thinking Outside the Boxwood

The animal shapes of the kids playground equipment are amazing and great reference for making some almost mid century topiary shapes. 

 

Kenneth Lynch & Sons, Inc., Thinking Outside the Boxwood Kenneth Lynch & Sons, Inc., Thinking Outside the Boxwood

The straight lines of the chairs on the bottom left feel modern and contemporary. Even the scroll own on the loungers are unique and different from current items on the market. 

 

Here are some photos from the current catalog of products. You can see the catalogs are set up much of the same way with black and white photos.

Kenneth Lynch & Sons, Inc., Thinking Outside the Boxwood Kenneth Lynch & Sons, Inc., Thinking Outside the Boxwood

Their current catalog has beautiful cisterns that would great in formal spaces or used as garden planters. The catalog also includes cast stone and lead animal statues; deer, dogs, birds and the more exotic kangaroo or hippo.  

 

I would recommend the 1970s (or 60’s) book for any garden designer for creative reference. I found a few listed on eBay for anyone interested:

  • 1966 Garden Ornaments Catalog, by Kenneth Lynch & Sons – currently $50, Buy it Now.
  • 1961 Garden Ornaments Wholesale Catalog – Kenneth Lynch & Sons – Currently $45, Buy it Now
  • Garden Ornament an Encyclopedia from Kenneth Lynch & Sons – currently $16 (this is a bound book compared to my copy, and looks to have different images)

Here are links to the Kenneth Lynch & Sons company information. I was not able to find a lot of color photograph examples of their products nor have I ever used their products.

 

If any one is interested in the full article from The Saturday Evening Post, I can scan the article and send you a pdf. It was very entertaining and you appreciate all that Lynch accomplished in his life.

Annual trip to Detroit

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Last weekend I made my semi-annual trip up to the northern suburbs of Detroit for work and inspiration reboot (there are lots of photos to share). I have posted about this trip before, but I find new inspiration each time I go. Detroit is in the news mainly about the post apocalyptic state and mass exodus of the city proper residents. However those who can invest in the city and outside in the suburbs, really are investing, building and taking pride in their area. I am not one to go into the politics of the situation, but I do advocate visiting Detroit. We ate very well, explored very different areas and met with passionate gardeners. The Pure Michigan commercials really are true.

 

One of the main reasons for the timing of our trip was to take part of Detroit Garden Work’s annual Garden Cruise benefiting Greening of Detroit. I believe Deborah Silver and the folks at Branch and Detroit Garden Works are true artists, craftsmen and really just pure genius. When we drive around, you can spot Deborah’s work instantly in either container design or the form she creates in a garden. I really wanted the chance to tour her gardens from more than the street, and the pleasure of touring her own garden at home. There were six gardens featured, some all by Deborah others were a combo of her and the home owners.  Here are photos from the gardens on the tour:

 

Annual Trip to Detroit,  Detroit Garden Work's Garden Cruise, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

The containers are Branch Studio designed and were planted well over 10 feet tall. The photo does not do the scale justice.

 

Annual Trip to Detroit,  Detroit Garden Work's Garden Cruise, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

 

The next house on the tour was a smaller Tudor style with a silver front yard and pure green structural back yard.

Annual Trip to Detroit,  Detroit Garden Work's Garden Cruise, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

This home featured a front bed planted with three pure silver plants, that provided a calm palette with movement and texture. See the photos below for the whole layered design.

Annual Trip to Detroit,  Detroit Garden Work's Garden Cruise, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

Annual Trip to Detroit,  Detroit Garden Work's Garden Cruise, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

The home also featured branch studio window boxes planted with:

Annual Trip to Detroit,  Detroit Garden Work's Garden Cruise, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

 

Annual Trip to Detroit,  Detroit Garden Work's Garden Cruise, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

The sphere and water features are both designed by Branch Studio via Detroit Garden Works.

 

Another house on the tour featured an elliptical shaped garden and a border of perennials- but the true show stoppers were the twin fountains flanking the central walkway.

Annual Trip to Detroit,  Detroit Garden Work's Garden Cruise, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

 

Our final stop on the tour was Deborah’s home. The show stopping feature were the home’s original containers (featured below) and her bubbling water feature. Annual Trip to Detroit,  Detroit Garden Work's Garden Cruise, Thinking Outside the Boxwood Annual Trip to Detroit,  Detroit Garden Work's Garden Cruise, Thinking Outside the Boxwood Annual Trip to Detroit,  Detroit Garden Work's Garden Cruise, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

Annual Trip to Detroit,  Detroit Garden Work's Garden Cruise, Thinking Outside the BoxwoodAnnual Trip to Detroit,  Detroit Garden Work's Garden Cruise, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

Annual Trip to Detroit,  Detroit Garden Work's Garden Cruise, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

 

Since our trip was to pick up some containers from Detroit Garden Works, Here are some photos from the store. They create and import some of the finest garden containers and decor. Always worth a visit to see the unique.

Annual Trip to Detroit,  Detroit Garden Works, Thinking Outside the Boxwood Annual Trip to Detroit,  Detroit Garden Works, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

 

This water feature was insane. It was created by welding all the individual rods by men swapping every 20 minutes to ensure a random pattern.

Annual Trip to Detroit,  Detroit Garden Works, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

 

We also made our first visit to Urban Detroit Gardens and Fleur Detroit which is just down the street from Detroit Garden Works. Honestly kicked ourselves for never stopping on previous trips. The shop blends the entire garden lifestyle with outdoor, interiors and flowers/events.

Annual Trip to Detroit, Urban Detroit Gardens and Fleur Detroit , Thinking Outside the Boxwood Annual Trip to Detroit, Urban Detroit Gardens and Fleur Detroit , Thinking Outside the Boxwood Annual Trip to Detroit, Urban Detroit Gardens and Fleur Detroit , Thinking Outside the Boxwood

 

Our Trip also included a visit to Cranbrook Educational Community Campus in Bloomfield Hills and Greenfield Village in Dearborn. The sprawling Cranbrook campus includes k-9 schools, collage and two museums.

Annual Trip to Detroit, Cranbrook Educational Community Campus , Thinking Outside the Boxwood A water feature at the Cranbrook Art Museum. There was so much more to take photos of, but we had rambunctious kids, so taking photos was limited.

 

Annual Trip to Detroit, Cranbrook Educational Community Campus , Thinking Outside the Boxwood

This was the Corten landform at the entrance of the campus. Corten has yet to make its appearance in Columbus, but you see it all round in Detroit’s landscapes.

 

Below is are garden at an 1600’s English cottage at Greenfield Village. We spent a full five hours touring the buildings, playing and riding the train. What Henry Ford created was almost like the Disney World for historical life. Buildings from across America and England were transported to the village to compile a 300 year view into working and living experiences.

Annual Trip to Detroit, Greenfield Village , Thinking Outside the BoxwoodAnnual Trip to Detroit, Greenfield Village , Thinking Outside the Boxwood

 

So there was our Trip to Detroit in a 20 or so photos. I could add a few more must see places, so if anyone is interested in my complete list of places to see while in the area send me an email or comment. I feel like an unofficial ambassador for Southeast Michigan.

 

In Bloom – July 21

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First, want to ask for a favor and your vote for best Professional Landscape on Gardenista’s Considered Design Awards. It was a surprise on Sunday to hear we were a finalist and are a few days behind on voting. I would greatly appreciate your daily vote here:

Gardenista Considered Design Awards. 

 

Now to this week’s In Bloom post. To mix things up this week, we are featuring the flowers in bloom as boutonnieres made by our resident floral designer at McCullough’s Landscape- great job Steve!  Both of these boutonnieres feature thistles from previous weeks with additional foliage now previously used. The benefit of the thistles is the heads are long term beauties in the garden, hence their feature for the past few weeks.

 

In Bloom - July 21, Thinking Outside the Boxwood- Plant Id at http://thinkingoutsidetheboxwood.com/ In Bloom - July 21, Thinking Outside the Boxwood- Plant Id at http://thinkingoutsidetheboxwood.com/

Top: Erygium alphium, Erygium yuccifolium (foliage) and Echeveria ‘Lola’

Bottom: Erygium yuccifolium, Foeniculum vulgare (Bronze Fennel) Plectranthus ‘Cerveza n Lime’

See the blooms from the previous two weeks:

July 7

July 14

 

I see that my past three posts all feature arrangements, so need to get back on the design posts more to come this week feature ideas and inspiration from my annual trip to Detroit.