Lessons from Moss Mountain Farm

G A R D E N S, Inspiration, Landscape Design | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Elements of Moss Mountain farm you can use in your own garden - thinkingoutsidetheboxwood.com

Back in May, I was fortunate to be invited back to P. Allen Smith’s Moss Mountain Farm for the seventh Garden2Grow, my second. The event features two days of brands and passionate social gurus across home, food and gardening categories touring an amazing garden, discussing and learning from folks openly sharing their knowledge. After I left Arkansas, I came back re-energized with expanded knowledge and network of colleagues.

 

Elements of Moss Mountain farm you can use in your own garden - thinkingoutsidetheboxwood.com

Allen designed Moss Mountain as a ferme ornée, a French phrase translated into ornamental farm. This was the same concept Thomas Jefferson applied in the grounds around Monticello, making the utility of farming beautiful and enjoyable to view. Ferme ornée can be applied to any home by incorporating utility plantings and elements into your ornamental garden beds with your neighbors being none the wiser. In the spirit of transforming your home into a ferme ornée, here are some elements from Moss Mountain you can apply in any home garden.

 

 

Ornamental Mow Paths

In the Midwest we have the luxury of space many do not have, but often open space around homes is surrounded by expansive field of grass. Moss Mountain features areas of native grasses and that are left to grow and only designed paths meandering paths mowed through.

Use designed mow paths to great interest in large open areas instead of large areas of formal lawn. Moss Mountain Farm - More details at thinkoutsidetheboxwood.com

Use designed mow paths to create structure in large informal areas, instead of maintaining formal lawn. Photo of Moss Mountain Farm, more at Thinkingoutsidetheboxwood.com

 

Signature Color

Outside the riot of bloom colors, using a signature color to tie together different areas of the garden and give all areas a sense of belonging to a certain place, signature paint color can provide that thread. Moss Mountain features trellis painted in a pale blue/green that match the gate of the decorative chicken pavilion. This color will continue to provide color to the garden, even when nothing is in bloom.

Use of a signature color throughout different garden rooms unifies spaces. garden trellises at Moss Mountain Farm - more images at Thinkingoutsidetheboxwood.com

Elements of Moss Mountain farm you can use in your own garden - thinkingoutsidetheboxwood.com

 

Dark Framework

Throughout the farm, the outbuildings all share the same signature dark black/brown color (another signature color). Dark architectural elements provide an amazing backdrop of the varied greens to pop and play hero compared to using white that can steal the spotlight from your plantings.

Dark colors on architectural elements provide striking element to the green foliage in a garden. Fence at Moss Mountain Farm - more at Thinking Outside The Boxwood

A collection of cut floral from uBloom waiting to be arranged, barn at Moss Mountain Farm. More images at thinkingoutsidetheboxwood.com

 

Vegetable Garden Architecture

The vegetable garden at Moss Mountain is breathtaking in its formal planting design, scale and planting combination. The scale is difficult for many, but the combination of structure throughout is a source of inspiration and application. Using walk-able tunnels and natural elements for vining plants, a hedge row of asparagus for structure and hierarchy plantings in each bed take the very utilitarian and productive garden into a beautiful to view space. Below Allen used a common hog fence panel to sculpt his tunnel.

Using wire hog fencing to create a creeping vine tunnel to add structure to your vegetable garden. Garden at Moss Mountain Farm - More images at thinkingoutsidetheboxwood.com

 

 

Edibles in Formal Areas

Directly surrounding the house are the formal, terraced gardens which feature a collection of annual and perennial plantings. Throughout the space, specimen edibles are placed to great structure and texture. Espalier apples and pears separate beds areas and a fig tree is focal point down a central pathway.

espiler trees in the formal gardens of Moss Mountain Farm - more images at thinkingoutsidetheboxwood.com

Elements for Moss Mountain Farm you can bring into your own garden. More at Thinkingoutsideboxwood.com

 

There are many more takeaways for any visitor to Moss Mountain beyond those mentioned above. On top of those listed, I still learned still more about video production, Instagram content, and content creation that I am still digesting.

 

Clouds rolling in at Moss Mountain Farm - More at thinkingoutsidetheboxwood.com

 

Our travels and the Garden2Grow event were sponsored by a list of great companies listed and linked below. Many of these are brands I have used personally and professionally before this event and continue after, others have altered my habits and the coffee we drink at home after learning from them.

Bonnie Plants

Good Dirt

Crescent Garden

Westrook Coffee Company

Sun Patiens

Sakata Home Grown

Random Gardening Links and Recommendations

Inspiration | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , ,

This amazing spring weather we are having in February has been a blessing and a curse. We are able to get out and work and enjoy beautiful weather, but we all know winter is still here and hope she does not wreak too much havoc on the daffodils and spring flowers. Wanted to share a few quick links and thoughts.

 

 

Better Homes and Gardens March Issue, must buy! 

March is always the garden/outdoor issue for shelter and lifestyle magazines, but Better Homes and Gardens hit it out of the park with this issue. I highly recommend you pick up a copy, for not only the great information but to support the issue. There is a great dry climate garden by David Salman from High Country Gardens, excellent collection of artfully arranged expert advise and beautiful living carpet. Stephen Orr (@steporr) of The New American Herbal and Tomorrow’s Garden is the editor, which you can see how he is elevating the “Garden” in Better Homes and Gardens.  The cover story on tulips is beautifully shot with lots of great varieties showcased, just wish they showed how to actually add to your garden with companion plants, but that is just the designer in me wanting to highlight the entire experience not just single plants.

Random Gardening Links and Recommendations, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

 

 

Lexington Road Trip Highlights:

Every February, our son has a 4 day weekend and we take advantage with a quick family road trip. Last year we went to Nashville for the Antique show, and this year we went to Lexington, KY with some stops on the Bourbon Trail and Horse farms (which was amazing). However there were other highlights which included connecting with Jon Carloftis and Dale Fisher from Jon Carlofits Fine Gardens at their amazing home, Botherum. It was an evening that the whole family will never forget, and a showcase of true Kentucky hospitality.

 

We also stopped at two nurseries, Pemberton’s (from Jon’s Recommendation) and Michler’s. Even though it is still Feburary, we had an amazing time exploring both spaces. Michler’s was a maze of old greenhouses with crazy details in the old buildings and Pemberton’s greenhouses packed with winterizing tropicals was like a private botanical garden. Not to mention the greenhouse knowledge of the fifth generation (maybe 6th) family running the nursery.  We need to make a return visit sometime soon, to see the spaces in their Pre-Derby prime and visit a few more Distilleries and Farms.

Botherum, Jon Carloftis Fine Garden , Thinking Outside the Boxwood Random Gardening Links and Recommendations, Thinking Outside the Boxwood Random Gardening Links and Recommendations, Thinking Outside the Boxwood Random Gardening Links and Recommendations, Thinking Outside the Boxwood Random Gardening Links and Recommendations, Thinking Outside the Boxwood Random Gardening Links and Recommendations, Thinking Outside the Boxwood Random Gardening Links and Recommendations, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

 

 

ENTER TO WIN A TRIP TO ANY BOTANICAL GARDEN.

Every gardener needs to enter this contest to win a trip to any American Botanical Garden of your choice.  Enter at this link –http://swee.ps/tivnxcIo and select your desired botanical garden and list why to be entered before April 30. I entered with a desire to visit the New York Botanical Garden, which I still to this date have not visited. I also selfishly would take the trip to also visit the High Line and the Russell Page garden at the Frick. If looking for some ideas where to visit here are a few  recommends

 

This Tuesday I am heading up to Cleveland to hear Patrick Blanc speak on vertical gardening. Other than that I will be in the garden as much as I can or working away getting everything moving forward for spring.

 

Association of Professional Landscape Designers (APLD) Conference Recap, 2016 Santa Fe

Garden Tours, Inspiration, Landscape Design | Tagged , , , , , , , , , ,

As promised in my previous post of great conferences and events to attend in 2017, here my heavy pictorial recap of the 2016 Association of Professional Landscape Designers (APLD) International Landscape Design Conference in Santa Fe, New Mexico.  This has taken longer than expected to post with image uploading issues, sorry for the delay. The conference was titled “The Art of Adaptive Design,” which Santa Fe was the perfect backdrop to manifest the theme. With an region that gets 14 inches of yearly landfall, dry rocky soils and strict architecture guidelines, landscapes in the area all follow the hand of mother nature first in their design. I was very naive about Santa Fe’s culture and artist community and was blown away by the artistry was incorporated into all the landscapes around the city and gardens we toured.

THE HOST CITY, SANTA FE

I am not an expect on Santa Fe, but what I experienced on my walking tours before, during and after the conference was filled with inspiration. The city is easy walk around around, meandering through parks and art studios.

Santa Fe Pollinator Box with rust patina from Thinking Outside the Boxwood

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THE CONFERENCE IN CLASS SESSIONS:

Here is a link to the conference attendee brochure, providing details on all the events, speakers and tours associated with the conference. I recommend reading to give you a better idea of the structure of the conference and more specific details on the sessions offered.  There were breakout sessions for Design, Water and Plants offering all the attendees a variety to topics and like minded to network. In the pre-conference activities I wish I attended was a Design Charette, where teams toured a site and worked on a sustainable design solutions to present back to the group. This is a great opportunity to work with peers and learn from other designers creative and problem solving processes.

Another great opportunity I had was to host a round table dinner to talk about social media in the landscape profession. These round table sessions allow designers to meet with board members and talk about different issues relating to our profession in a small, intimate and social setting. Our group had lively conversation and an amazing meal at Radish & Rye.

CONFERENCE TOURS:

Ok, now on to the photos. I will not bother with words for each image and let them speak for themselves, but over all the gardens we toured in Santa Fe were all so innovative. They each incorporated the transition between indoors and outdoors, used diverse materials outside of plants and 100% focused on a designs that are sustainable.  Featured below are images form private gardens, the Santa Fe Railyard, and the newly establish Santa Fe Botanical Garden.

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