Great Garden Design – Outdoor Sinks

Garden Tours, Inspiration

The benefit of touring private gardens is you get to see the functional elements they add to the garden you don’t get to see in display gardens. As the complexity of outdoor kitchens expand, so do the frequency of seeing outdoor sinks. Not necessary like a grill and many times a hose can fulfill the need of a sink to wash or rinse. However, the following sinks prove a beautiful sink can be designed into a garden and not feel like a repeat of indoor kitchen.

Great Garden Design - Outdoor Sinks. well designed outdoor sinks using natural soap stone, concrete or stainless. Thinkingoutsidetheboxwood.com

This grill and soapstone sink laid on a natural stone base blend naturally into the garden. The soapstone is a great stone that holds up outdoors. 

 

Great Garden Design - Outdoor Sinks. well designed outdoor sinks using natural soap stone, concrete or stainless. Thinkingoutsidetheboxwood.com

This sink is made of strips of granite feels natural in the garden with the stone pedestal base.   

 

A soapstone greenhouse sink seen on the APLD Boston Trip. From ThinkingOutsidetheBoxwood.com

Another soapstone slab sink found in a greenhouse not at an outdoor kitchen is another great sink design that is very practical with the arched faucet for filling watering cans or watering plants. The secondary hose hookup also makes the area useful for using the single water source for the most functions possible.  

 

In storage we have a single bay concrete sink we saved out of a basement laundry room that we plan on using in our (far) future outdoor kitchen and greenhouse combo area. We will not have it plumbed, but instead use a nearby hose and a bucket to reuse waste water for watering plants. It will be a space to wash dirty hands and veggies from the garden.

 

Lessons from Moss Mountain Farm

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Elements of Moss Mountain farm you can use in your own garden - thinkingoutsidetheboxwood.com

Back in May, I was fortunate to be invited back to P. Allen Smith’s Moss Mountain Farm for the seventh Garden2Grow, my second. The event features two days of brands and passionate social gurus across home, food and gardening categories touring an amazing garden, discussing and learning from folks openly sharing their knowledge. After I left Arkansas, I came back re-energized with expanded knowledge and network of colleagues.

 

Elements of Moss Mountain farm you can use in your own garden - thinkingoutsidetheboxwood.com

Allen designed Moss Mountain as a ferme ornée, a French phrase translated into ornamental farm. This was the same concept Thomas Jefferson applied in the grounds around Monticello, making the utility of farming beautiful and enjoyable to view. Ferme ornée can be applied to any home by incorporating utility plantings and elements into your ornamental garden beds with your neighbors being none the wiser. In the spirit of transforming your home into a ferme ornée, here are some elements from Moss Mountain you can apply in any home garden.

 

 

Ornamental Mow Paths

In the Midwest we have the luxury of space many do not have, but often open space around homes is surrounded by expansive field of grass. Moss Mountain features areas of native grasses and that are left to grow and only designed paths meandering paths mowed through.

Use designed mow paths to great interest in large open areas instead of large areas of formal lawn. Moss Mountain Farm - More details at thinkoutsidetheboxwood.com

Use designed mow paths to create structure in large informal areas, instead of maintaining formal lawn. Photo of Moss Mountain Farm, more at Thinkingoutsidetheboxwood.com

 

Signature Color

Outside the riot of bloom colors, using a signature color to tie together different areas of the garden and give all areas a sense of belonging to a certain place, signature paint color can provide that thread. Moss Mountain features trellis painted in a pale blue/green that match the gate of the decorative chicken pavilion. This color will continue to provide color to the garden, even when nothing is in bloom.

Use of a signature color throughout different garden rooms unifies spaces. garden trellises at Moss Mountain Farm - more images at Thinkingoutsidetheboxwood.com

Elements of Moss Mountain farm you can use in your own garden - thinkingoutsidetheboxwood.com

 

Dark Framework

Throughout the farm, the outbuildings all share the same signature dark black/brown color (another signature color). Dark architectural elements provide an amazing backdrop of the varied greens to pop and play hero compared to using white that can steal the spotlight from your plantings.

Dark colors on architectural elements provide striking element to the green foliage in a garden. Fence at Moss Mountain Farm - more at Thinking Outside The Boxwood

A collection of cut floral from uBloom waiting to be arranged, barn at Moss Mountain Farm. More images at thinkingoutsidetheboxwood.com

 

Vegetable Garden Architecture

The vegetable garden at Moss Mountain is breathtaking in its formal planting design, scale and planting combination. The scale is difficult for many, but the combination of structure throughout is a source of inspiration and application. Using walk-able tunnels and natural elements for vining plants, a hedge row of asparagus for structure and hierarchy plantings in each bed take the very utilitarian and productive garden into a beautiful to view space. Below Allen used a common hog fence panel to sculpt his tunnel.

Using wire hog fencing to create a creeping vine tunnel to add structure to your vegetable garden. Garden at Moss Mountain Farm - More images at thinkingoutsidetheboxwood.com

 

 

Edibles in Formal Areas

Directly surrounding the house are the formal, terraced gardens which feature a collection of annual and perennial plantings. Throughout the space, specimen edibles are placed to great structure and texture. Espalier apples and pears separate beds areas and a fig tree is focal point down a central pathway.

espiler trees in the formal gardens of Moss Mountain Farm - more images at thinkingoutsidetheboxwood.com

Elements for Moss Mountain Farm you can bring into your own garden. More at Thinkingoutsideboxwood.com

 

There are many more takeaways for any visitor to Moss Mountain beyond those mentioned above. On top of those listed, I still learned still more about video production, Instagram content, and content creation that I am still digesting.

 

Clouds rolling in at Moss Mountain Farm - More at thinkingoutsidetheboxwood.com

 

Our travels and the Garden2Grow event were sponsored by a list of great companies listed and linked below. Many of these are brands I have used personally and professionally before this event and continue after, others have altered my habits and the coffee we drink at home after learning from them.

Bonnie Plants

Good Dirt

Crescent Garden

Westrook Coffee Company

Sun Patiens

Sakata Home Grown

Random Gardening Links and Recommendations

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This amazing spring weather we are having in February has been a blessing and a curse. We are able to get out and work and enjoy beautiful weather, but we all know winter is still here and hope she does not wreak too much havoc on the daffodils and spring flowers. Wanted to share a few quick links and thoughts.

 

 

Better Homes and Gardens March Issue, must buy! 

March is always the garden/outdoor issue for shelter and lifestyle magazines, but Better Homes and Gardens hit it out of the park with this issue. I highly recommend you pick up a copy, for not only the great information but to support the issue. There is a great dry climate garden by David Salman from High Country Gardens, excellent collection of artfully arranged expert advise and beautiful living carpet. Stephen Orr (@steporr) of The New American Herbal and Tomorrow’s Garden is the editor, which you can see how he is elevating the “Garden” in Better Homes and Gardens.  The cover story on tulips is beautifully shot with lots of great varieties showcased, just wish they showed how to actually add to your garden with companion plants, but that is just the designer in me wanting to highlight the entire experience not just single plants.

Random Gardening Links and Recommendations, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

 

 

Lexington Road Trip Highlights:

Every February, our son has a 4 day weekend and we take advantage with a quick family road trip. Last year we went to Nashville for the Antique show, and this year we went to Lexington, KY with some stops on the Bourbon Trail and Horse farms (which was amazing). However there were other highlights which included connecting with Jon Carloftis and Dale Fisher from Jon Carlofits Fine Gardens at their amazing home, Botherum. It was an evening that the whole family will never forget, and a showcase of true Kentucky hospitality.

 

We also stopped at two nurseries, Pemberton’s (from Jon’s Recommendation) and Michler’s. Even though it is still Feburary, we had an amazing time exploring both spaces. Michler’s was a maze of old greenhouses with crazy details in the old buildings and Pemberton’s greenhouses packed with winterizing tropicals was like a private botanical garden. Not to mention the greenhouse knowledge of the fifth generation (maybe 6th) family running the nursery.  We need to make a return visit sometime soon, to see the spaces in their Pre-Derby prime and visit a few more Distilleries and Farms.

Botherum, Jon Carloftis Fine Garden , Thinking Outside the Boxwood Random Gardening Links and Recommendations, Thinking Outside the Boxwood Random Gardening Links and Recommendations, Thinking Outside the Boxwood Random Gardening Links and Recommendations, Thinking Outside the Boxwood Random Gardening Links and Recommendations, Thinking Outside the Boxwood Random Gardening Links and Recommendations, Thinking Outside the Boxwood Random Gardening Links and Recommendations, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

 

 

ENTER TO WIN A TRIP TO ANY BOTANICAL GARDEN.

Every gardener needs to enter this contest to win a trip to any American Botanical Garden of your choice.  Enter at this link –http://swee.ps/tivnxcIo and select your desired botanical garden and list why to be entered before April 30. I entered with a desire to visit the New York Botanical Garden, which I still to this date have not visited. I also selfishly would take the trip to also visit the High Line and the Russell Page garden at the Frick. If looking for some ideas where to visit here are a few  recommends

 

This Tuesday I am heading up to Cleveland to hear Patrick Blanc speak on vertical gardening. Other than that I will be in the garden as much as I can or working away getting everything moving forward for spring.

 

Association of Professional Landscape Designers (APLD) Conference Recap, 2016 Santa Fe

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As promised in my previous post of great conferences and events to attend in 2017, here my heavy pictorial recap of the 2016 Association of Professional Landscape Designers (APLD) International Landscape Design Conference in Santa Fe, New Mexico.  This has taken longer than expected to post with image uploading issues, sorry for the delay. The conference was titled “The Art of Adaptive Design,” which Santa Fe was the perfect backdrop to manifest the theme. With an region that gets 14 inches of yearly landfall, dry rocky soils and strict architecture guidelines, landscapes in the area all follow the hand of mother nature first in their design. I was very naive about Santa Fe’s culture and artist community and was blown away by the artistry was incorporated into all the landscapes around the city and gardens we toured.

THE HOST CITY, SANTA FE

I am not an expect on Santa Fe, but what I experienced on my walking tours before, during and after the conference was filled with inspiration. The city is easy walk around around, meandering through parks and art studios.

Santa Fe Pollinator Box with rust patina from Thinking Outside the Boxwood

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THE CONFERENCE IN CLASS SESSIONS:

Here is a link to the conference attendee brochure, providing details on all the events, speakers and tours associated with the conference. I recommend reading to give you a better idea of the structure of the conference and more specific details on the sessions offered.  There were breakout sessions for Design, Water and Plants offering all the attendees a variety to topics and like minded to network. In the pre-conference activities I wish I attended was a Design Charette, where teams toured a site and worked on a sustainable design solutions to present back to the group. This is a great opportunity to work with peers and learn from other designers creative and problem solving processes.

Another great opportunity I had was to host a round table dinner to talk about social media in the landscape profession. These round table sessions allow designers to meet with board members and talk about different issues relating to our profession in a small, intimate and social setting. Our group had lively conversation and an amazing meal at Radish & Rye.

CONFERENCE TOURS:

Ok, now on to the photos. I will not bother with words for each image and let them speak for themselves, but over all the gardens we toured in Santa Fe were all so innovative. They each incorporated the transition between indoors and outdoors, used diverse materials outside of plants and 100% focused on a designs that are sustainable.  Featured below are images form private gardens, the Santa Fe Railyard, and the newly establish Santa Fe Botanical Garden.

 2016 APLD Conference Recap, Santa Fe, Thinking Outside the Boxwood 2016 APLD Conference Recap, Santa Fe, Thinking Outside the Boxwood 2016 APLD Conference Recap, Santa Fe, Thinking Outside the Boxwood   2016 APLD Conference Recap, Santa Fe, Thinking Outside the Boxwood 2016 APLD Conference Recap, Santa Fe, Thinking Outside the Boxwood 2016 APLD Conference Recap, Santa Fe, Thinking Outside the Boxwood 2016 APLD Conference Recap, Santa Fe, Thinking Outside the Boxwood     2016 APLD Conference Recap, Santa Fe, Thinking Outside the Boxwood 2016 APLD Conference Recap, Santa Fe, Thinking Outside the Boxwood 2016 APLD Conference Recap, Santa Fe, Thinking Outside the Boxwood 2016 APLD Conference Recap, Santa Fe, Thinking Outside the Boxwood 2016 APLD Conference Recap, Santa Fe, Thinking Outside the Boxwood 2016 APLD Conference Recap, Santa Fe, Thinking Outside the Boxwood 2016 APLD Conference Recap, Santa Fe, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

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Designer’s Block- Ground Plain Inspiration

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This is the time of the year when I need to be on my game, the most creative, innovative…..  However this the point in the year when I feel most removed and beaten down by the winter.  To combat this “Designer’s Block” I peruse through images…. Pinterest, Instagram, and pictures from my travels.  Garden visiting is so vital to my creative being.  A change of scenery goes a long way into the generation of ideas.  I cherish the images I am able to capture on these journeys.

Today the focus is on the ground plain.  Paving is such a great way to set yourself as a designer.  I pride myself on my patterns and schemes I work into my designs.  Yes, I am a complete plant nerd- but I also love architecture and pattern.

Please enjoy images from my travels and I hope you find inspiration the pattern…..Maybe it will help to get you out of a funk, like it did me!

Designer's Block- Ground Plain Inspiration, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

Designer's Block- Ground Plain Inspiration, Thinking Outside the Boxwood Designer's Block- Ground Plain Inspiration, Thinking Outside the Boxwood Designer's Block- Ground Plain Inspiration, Thinking Outside the Boxwood Designer's Block- Ground Plain Inspiration, Thinking Outside the Boxwood Designer's Block- Ground Plain Inspiration, Thinking Outside the Boxwood Designer's Block- Ground Plain Inspiration, Thinking Outside the Boxwood Designer's Block- Ground Plain Inspiration, Thinking Outside the Boxwood Designer's Block- Ground Plain Inspiration, Thinking Outside the Boxwood Designer's Block- Ground Plain Inspiration, Thinking Outside the Boxwood Designer's Block- Ground Plain Inspiration, Thinking Outside the Boxwood Designer's Block- Ground Plain Inspiration, Thinking Outside the Boxwood Designer's Block- Ground Plain Inspiration, Thinking Outside the Boxwood Designer's Block- Ground Plain Inspiration, Thinking Outside the Boxwood Designer's Block- Ground Plain Inspiration, Thinking Outside the Boxwood Designer's Block- Ground Plain Inspiration, Thinking Outside the Boxwood Designer's Block- Ground Plain Inspiration, Thinking Outside the Boxwood Designer's Block- Ground Plain Inspiration, Thinking Outside the Boxwood Designer's Block- Ground Plain Inspiration, Thinking Outside the Boxwood Designer's Block- Ground Plain Inspiration, Thinking Outside the Boxwood Designer's Block- Ground Plain Inspiration, Thinking Outside the Boxwood Designer's Block- Ground Plain Inspiration, Thinking Outside the BoxwoodDesigner's Block- Ground Plain Inspiration, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

Designer's Block- Ground Plain Inspiration, Thinking Outside the Boxwood Designer's Block- Ground Plain Inspiration, Thinking Outside the Boxwood Designer's Block- Ground Plain Inspiration, Thinking Outside the Boxwood Designer's Block- Ground Plain Inspiration, Thinking Outside the Boxwood Designer's Block- Ground Plain Inspiration, Thinking Outside the Boxwood Designer's Block- Ground Plain Inspiration, Thinking Outside the Boxwood Designer's Block- Ground Plain Inspiration, Thinking Outside the Boxwood Designer's Block- Ground Plain Inspiration, Thinking Outside the Boxwood Designer's Block- Ground Plain Inspiration, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

Garden Inspiration – Chanticleer Gardens

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I have been absent all summer from blogging, but am back with a post crammed with garden porn to make up for lost time.   In mid-October I was outside Philadelphia speaking at the Perennial Plant Conference hosted by Chanticleer Garden, Longwood Gardens, and Scott Arboretum (Swarthmore College).  Put it on your calendar next year!  The lineup of speakers was second to none- excluding yours truly!   What amazing event!  Make a trip of it and go next year- you will not be disappointed!  The day after the conference the fellow speakers and I had the opportunity to tour “America’s Garden Capital”, which is the greater Philadelphia area.

I have had some amazing opportunities to visit gardens across North America and Europe and true-be-told nothing gets me going like Chanticleer Garden.  There is something about the place….maybe it is the merging of art and horticulture?  Whatever it is, it is horticulture at its highest level.  It has been a few years since I last visited, which was on a hot July day. This time it was different, summer had come to an end and autumn was setting in.  The plants and borders were at their height of maturity but had not yet given up the ghost to the cool temperatures.  We were walked the garden with a few of the gardeners: Dan Benarcik, Lisa Roper, Jonathan Wright, and Bill Thomas (Executive Director & Head Gardener).   As we walked through the garden we were able to talk shop with them- stuff all gardeners love to do…..To hear their insight, their struggle, and see their successes made the garden that much more special to me.  The garden is ever evolving and pushing the envelope of what we know as gardening.  If you haven’t visited- go!  If you have gone- go again!  If you can’t make it- buy their new book from Timber Press… Both beautifully written and shot!  I know I am not the only gardener out there hoping this day would finally come!

The Art of Gardening: Design Inspiration and Innovative Planting Techniques from ChanticleerBy The Chanticleer Gardeners and R. William Thomas, Timber Press 2015

The Art of Gardening: Design Inspiration and Innovative Planting Techniques from Chanticleer By The Chanticleer Gardeners and R. William Thomas Photographs by Rob Cardillo. Timber Press 2015. Thinking Outside the Boxwood

This was an amazing opportunity to talk horticulture with fellow plant geeks and use my camera which has spent way too much time in the closet over the summer.  There is much more to come from this trip soon in up coming posts.  In the mean time enjoy some garden porn!  And thank you Geoff, from Utah, for your words of encouragement!

Chanticleer- A Pleasure Garden, Thinking Outside the Boxwood Chanticleer- A Pleasure Garden, Thinking Outside the Boxwood Chanticleer- A Pleasure Garden, Thinking Outside the Boxwood Chanticleer- A Pleasure Garden, Thinking Outside the Boxwood Chanticleer- A Pleasure Garden, Thinking Outside the Boxwood Chanticleer- A Pleasure Garden, Thinking Outside the Boxwood Chanticleer- A Pleasure Garden, Thinking Outside the Boxwood Chanticleer- A Pleasure Garden, Thinking Outside the Boxwood Chanticleer- A Pleasure Garden, Thinking Outside the Boxwood Chanticleer- A Pleasure Garden, Thinking Outside the Boxwood Chanticleer- A Pleasure Garden, Thinking Outside the Boxwood Chanticleer- A Pleasure Garden, Thinking Outside the Boxwood Chanticleer- A Pleasure Garden, Thinking Outside the Boxwood Chanticleer- A Pleasure Garden, Thinking Outside the Boxwood Chanticleer- A Pleasure Garden, Thinking Outside the Boxwood Chanticleer- A Pleasure Garden, Thinking Outside the Boxwood Chanticleer- A Pleasure Garden, Thinking Outside the Boxwood Chanticleer- A Pleasure Garden, Thinking Outside the Boxwood Chanticleer- A Pleasure Garden, Thinking Outside the Boxwood Chanticleer- A Pleasure Garden, Thinking Outside the Boxwood Chanticleer- A Pleasure Garden, Thinking Outside the Boxwood Chanticleer- A Pleasure Garden, Thinking Outside the Boxwood Chanticleer- A Pleasure Garden, Thinking Outside the Boxwood Chanticleer- A Pleasure Garden, Thinking Outside the Boxwood Chanticleer- A Pleasure Garden, Thinking Outside the Boxwood Chanticleer- A Pleasure Garden, Thinking Outside the Boxwood Chanticleer- A Pleasure Garden, Thinking Outside the Boxwood Chanticleer- A Pleasure Garden, Thinking Outside the Boxwood Chanticleer- A Pleasure Garden, Thinking Outside the Boxwood Chanticleer- A Pleasure Garden, Thinking Outside the Boxwood Chanticleer- A Pleasure Garden, Thinking Outside the Boxwood Chanticleer- A Pleasure Garden, Thinking Outside the Boxwood Chanticleer- A Pleasure Garden, Thinking Outside the Boxwood Chanticleer- A Pleasure Garden, Thinking Outside the Boxwood Chanticleer- A Pleasure Garden, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

FOUND – Ina Garten’s Firebowl

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FOUND - Ina Garten's Firebowl, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

 (Image from The New York Times article – here)

 

I have long admired Ina Garten’s home and gardens from the articles published and images shared. I recently caught the tail end of her cooking show and was caught by the scale of her firebowl.  At 68 inches wide, the bowl is very wide (bigger than my dinning room table), but it is also elevated just below your waist thanks to a three-legged stand.  The scale and height makes it so unique and complements the scale of the sounding architecture and landscape. The height & size are great for cocktail gatherings where people mingle compared to lounging around encircle.  I was able to locate the same bowl via FireFeatures.  The specifications denote 68NL Mild Steel Firebowl with three-legged stand, without the stand is about $4,300.  Not necessarily a price point for everyone, but gets you thinking of a different scale/height to use a firebowl.

 

FOUND - Ina Garten's Firebowl, Thinking Outside the BoxwoodFOUND - Ina Garten's Firebowl, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

I attempted to find some images of the bowl with people around for scale, and this photo via Foodnetwork.ca episode guide was as close as I could get. 

 

 

In reviewing the FireFeatures website, I found another project with a large bowl that included a mixed branch insert.  Intrigued by the surrounding gardens, I located additional photos of the project.  The property design is attributed to Benjamin Noriega-Ortiz and Brian E. Boyle, however I am unsure if they complete the garden design. I found the additional photos of the project via Yatzer.

FOUND - Ina Garten's Firebowl, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

FOUND - Ina Garten's Firebowl, Thinking Outside the Boxwood FOUND - Ina Garten's Firebowl, Thinking Outside the Boxwood FOUND - Ina Garten's Firebowl, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

 

The Barefoot Contessa episode I watched also included lighting designer Grey Yale, whose designs are featured throughout Ina’s home. He created the nighttime dinner lighting and used large helium balloons filled with lights flying over the barn patio area in addition to party lights in the trees. Despite fruitless efforts to find a photo of the party, I did find some 36’ white round balloons and LED balloon lights  via Amazon you could use to recreate the look.  I am going to give it a try, just need the right occasion to celebrate.

Garden Inspiration: Palace Het Loo

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Today in Central Ohio the temperatures are in the teens and the landscape it an abyss of white and grey.  Since I was feeling uninspired by my surrounding- I am sure that others may be in my shoes.  Over the years I have been very fortunate to visit gardens all over North America and Europe, call it a pilgrimage or a quest for inspiration.  One garden that inspired me was Palace Het Loo situated in Apeldoorn, Netherlands.  The Dutch Baroque garden, often called the ‘Versailles of Holland’. Though the gardens are similar to the Palace of Versailles , the gardens were not designed by Le Notre, rather his nephew Claude Desgots. The garden is formulated on the Baroque style of perfect symmetry, axial layout with radiating gravel walks, parterres with fountains, basins and statues.  If you are planning a summer trip to Holland I would recommend adding this to your stop.  I toured the gardens for about 3 hours and that seemed to be enough time.  Enjoy the photos and I hope you find inspiration.Garden Inspiration: Palace Het Loo, Thinking Outside the BoxwoodGarden Inspiration: Palace Het Loo, Thinking Outside the BoxwoodGarden Inspiration: Palace Het Loo, Thinking Outside the Boxwood- boxwood, nasturtium, and garden mums Garden Inspiration: Palace Het Loo, Thinking Outside the BoxwoodGarden Inspiration: Palace Het Loo, Thinking Outside the Boxwood- Taxus topiary and boxwood hedgesGarden Inspiration: Palace Het Loo, Thinking Outside the Boxwood- Axial symmetry and grand fountainsGarden Inspiration: Palace Het Loo, Thinking Outside the Boxwood- Hornbeam FramingGarden Inspiration: Palace Het Loo, Thinking Outside the Boxwood- Hornbeam avenue Garden Inspiration: Palace Het Loo, Thinking Outside the Boxwood- Boxwood and Orangery Garden Inspiration: Palace Het Loo, Thinking Outside the Boxwood- Beech hedgeGarden Inspiration: Palace Het Loo, Thinking Outside the Boxwood- Beech hedgeGarden Inspiration: Palace Het Loo, Thinking Outside the BoxwoodGarden Inspiration: Palace Het Loo, Thinking Outside the BoxwoodGarden Inspiration: Palace Het Loo, Thinking Outside the BoxwoodGarden Inspiration: Palace Het Loo, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

Millstones in the Garden

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Last year we completed a project that included a small water feature for the family’s dog to take a quick drink when outside. The feature needed to be low, include moving water and do the best at keeping the dog’s paws from getting soaked.  The solution we designed was an old millstone resting over river rocks with water bubbling up through the center of the stone and falling down the sides into a reservoir below.  This was not designed to be a large focal point of the garden, but was highly visible when on the patio space so had to find the right sized millstone. (I have no photo to share since we have not photographed the project yet, but will update the post once we shoot.) 

 

Millstones in the Garden, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

 This is a collection showcases the variation millstones can be found from English Garden Antiques (here). 

 

 

Millstones are fairly easy to find from back when milling of corn and wheat was done locally both on the larger and small scale, creating many different sized stones. Searching your local stone companies or Craigslist will produce lots of options. We found our stone over Craigslist in Southern Ohio as part of a the matched pair. Good key terms to search are; millstone, mill stone, antique.

 

Millstones in the Garden, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

Millstones in the Garden, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

The above two images are from a local stone suppliers (Lones Stone) selection of mill stones. Search your local stone suppliers to see what options are available. 

 

The stones are versatile for use the landscape given the variety of sizes and thicknesses.  They can be used as fountains, stepping stones, in paving, stone walls, table, bench or focal art. Here are some examples for creative inspiration.

 

Millstones in the Garden, Thinking Outside the Boxwood, Martha Stewart's Bedford, CT Home

Millstones in the Garden, Thinking Outside the Boxwood, Martha Stewart's Bedford, CT Home

The above two millstones are from Martha Stewart’s Bedford Farm. These are each incorporated into the hardscape areas. (Images from Martha’s Blog here)

 

Millstones in the Garden, Thinking Outside the Boxwood, Miriam's River House Designs

This garden designed by Miriam’s River House Designs, features a millstone at the center of a garden designed by the principles of a circle. (Image and more of the design found here)

 

Millstones in the Garden, Thinking Outside the Boxwood, Janice Parker Landscape Design

Janice Parker Landscape used a millstone fountain in the center of this landscape. (Image Janice Parker Landscape’s website, here)

 

Millstones in the Garden, Thinking Outside the Boxwood, Ten Eyck Landscape Architects, Austin TX

This millstone is used as a bench and gathering location in the personal garden of Christine Ten Eyck in Austin Texas. The image is from here and you can see more of Ten Eyck Landscape Architects work here

 

 

 

Millstones in the Garden, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

Here are large millstone is used as a table in the garden in the harsh salt air of Nantucket, MA. This garden is designed by The Garden Design Company, and you can find more of their work here. Image from Veranda Magazine here.

 

Millstones in the Garden, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

This image is from Ohio Barns (here) which showcases the old millstones from the Weisenberger Mill (near Lexington, KY) used in stone walls. 

 

Another great option to use are antique stone well caps. These have the same central hole, however are typically square or even more irregular. To help in search terms try well cap, well cover, stone and I include vintage and antique to weed out anything faux stone.

 

Millstones in the Garden, Thinking Outside the BoxwoodMillstones in the Garden, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

 The above are two examples of full slab well covers, the top one is from Central Main Stoneworks (Here) and the second if off Craig’s List near Cleveland Ohio. It is 64 x 48 x 8.5 inches of Sandstone. I love the moss covering the top and would be amazing used in any landscape. I am half tempted to buy and hoard it until I have a design to use it, or honestly my house. (here)