Design Identified – Andrea Cochran

G A R D E N S, gardening, Gardens, Inspiration, Landscape, Landscape Design | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

It’s funny how things click together. A couple of years ago when I was wondering the suburbs of Detroit I stumbled upon this massive residential job site.  The site was surrounded by a large screen- well of course that just sparked my interest. Then of course this past summer while in Detroit, I stumbled back across the finished product, a modern concrete house in the traditional Birmingham neighbor with a striking modern landscape. The landscape was particularly modern because of the use of Corten, land form and the use of mass planting. As a design element, corten steel is more often seen on the coasts and not much here in the Midwest outside of commercial design. I stopped and took photos of the house, but had the wrong lens for the camera so never posted. A few weeks later, while on Pinterest I came across an image of the garden attributed to Andrea Cochran, which perfectly aligns. Then just this week my wife handed me an old article from WSJ Magazine with the home owner and house featured (LINK to article here). Between the two sources it provided the complete story of the garden – the home owners tastes and desires with the landscape architect’s knowledge and aesthetic. (I was also able to get more details from some other sources).

Design Identified - Andrea Cochran, Thinking Outside the Boxwood, photo by Nick McCullough

Design Identified - Andrea Cochran, Thinking Outside the Boxwood, photo by Nick McCullough

Above two images I took during this summer (2014).

The plants palette for the garden was kept to a hand full of species- which is indicative a modern planting scheme.  From what I could see from the passerby point of view the plant list consists of Heritage River Birch (Betula nigra ‘Heritage’) single stem, Rhus aromatica ‘Grow-Low’ (Grow-Low Sumac), Thorn-less Honey Locust (Gledistsia triacanthos var. inermis), Yew (Taxus xmedia), Switch Grass (Panicum virgatum), Eastern Arborvitae (Thuja occidentalis),  Upright European Hornbeam (Carpinus betulus ‘Fastigiata’) or Upright European Beech (Fagus sylvatica ‘Fastigiata’)

 

Here is the background information from Andrea Cochran’s website:

“The courtyards of this Michigan residence are integral to the overall architecture. Each is an exquisitely designed piece of art that extends and enlivens the living spaces. Views into these oases offer a counterpoint to the austere modern interiors, while also providing immediate access to the open air. The designs both soften and create continuity with the character of the house, interweaving architecture and landscape seamlessly.”

Design Identified - Andrea Cochran, Thinking Outside the Boxwood, photo

Design Identified - Andrea Cochran, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

The above two images are taken from Andrea Cochran’s website. The first is of the street view of the home and the second is of the courtyard space behind the home.

 

Here are more details and schematics of the home via the architect of the home, Steven Sivak.  (LINK to more photos here).

Design Identified - Andrea Cochran, Thinking Outside the Boxwood Design Identified - Andrea Cochran, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

The plans are for the garage in the back to be covered in ivy and be a giant green box. This will be a unique area since it is already cocooned into a courtyard hedge.

 

Design Identified - Andrea Cochran, Thinking Outside the BoxwoodDesign Identified - Andrea Cochran, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

The above two images are taken from Andrea Cochran’s website. The cor-ten sculpture is created in the style of Chris Burden  and installed by MBM Fabricators.

 

Here are some of the plants IDed in the design of the project.

 

Annual trip to Detroit

Advice, annuals, art, Formal Garden, G A R D E N S, Garden Stores, Garden Structure, gardening, Gardens, Landscape Design, Landscape Products | Tagged , , , , ,

Last weekend I made my semi-annual trip up to the northern suburbs of Detroit for work and inspiration reboot (there are lots of photos to share). I have posted about this trip before, but I find new inspiration each time I go. Detroit is in the news mainly about the post apocalyptic state and mass exodus of the city proper residents. However those who can invest in the city and outside in the suburbs, really are investing, building and taking pride in their area. I am not one to go into the politics of the situation, but I do advocate visiting Detroit. We ate very well, explored very different areas and met with passionate gardeners. The Pure Michigan commercials really are true.

 

One of the main reasons for the timing of our trip was to take part of Detroit Garden Work’s annual Garden Cruise benefiting Greening of Detroit. I believe Deborah Silver and the folks at Branch and Detroit Garden Works are true artists, craftsmen and really just pure genius. When we drive around, you can spot Deborah’s work instantly in either container design or the form she creates in a garden. I really wanted the chance to tour her gardens from more than the street, and the pleasure of touring her own garden at home. There were six gardens featured, some all by Deborah others were a combo of her and the home owners.  Here are photos from the gardens on the tour:

 

Annual Trip to Detroit,  Detroit Garden Work's Garden Cruise, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

The containers are Branch Studio designed and were planted well over 10 feet tall. The photo does not do the scale justice.

 

Annual Trip to Detroit,  Detroit Garden Work's Garden Cruise, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

 

The next house on the tour was a smaller Tudor style with a silver front yard and pure green structural back yard.

Annual Trip to Detroit,  Detroit Garden Work's Garden Cruise, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

This home featured a front bed planted with three pure silver plants, that provided a calm palette with movement and texture. See the photos below for the whole layered design.

Annual Trip to Detroit,  Detroit Garden Work's Garden Cruise, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

Annual Trip to Detroit,  Detroit Garden Work's Garden Cruise, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

The home also featured branch studio window boxes planted with:

Annual Trip to Detroit,  Detroit Garden Work's Garden Cruise, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

 

Annual Trip to Detroit,  Detroit Garden Work's Garden Cruise, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

The sphere and water features are both designed by Branch Studio via Detroit Garden Works.

 

Another house on the tour featured an elliptical shaped garden and a border of perennials- but the true show stoppers were the twin fountains flanking the central walkway.

Annual Trip to Detroit,  Detroit Garden Work's Garden Cruise, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

 

Our final stop on the tour was Deborah’s home. The show stopping feature were the home’s original containers (featured below) and her bubbling water feature. Annual Trip to Detroit,  Detroit Garden Work's Garden Cruise, Thinking Outside the Boxwood Annual Trip to Detroit,  Detroit Garden Work's Garden Cruise, Thinking Outside the Boxwood Annual Trip to Detroit,  Detroit Garden Work's Garden Cruise, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

Annual Trip to Detroit,  Detroit Garden Work's Garden Cruise, Thinking Outside the BoxwoodAnnual Trip to Detroit,  Detroit Garden Work's Garden Cruise, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

Annual Trip to Detroit,  Detroit Garden Work's Garden Cruise, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

 

Since our trip was to pick up some containers from Detroit Garden Works, Here are some photos from the store. They create and import some of the finest garden containers and decor. Always worth a visit to see the unique.

Annual Trip to Detroit,  Detroit Garden Works, Thinking Outside the Boxwood Annual Trip to Detroit,  Detroit Garden Works, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

 

This water feature was insane. It was created by welding all the individual rods by men swapping every 20 minutes to ensure a random pattern.

Annual Trip to Detroit,  Detroit Garden Works, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

 

We also made our first visit to Urban Detroit Gardens and Fleur Detroit which is just down the street from Detroit Garden Works. Honestly kicked ourselves for never stopping on previous trips. The shop blends the entire garden lifestyle with outdoor, interiors and flowers/events.

Annual Trip to Detroit, Urban Detroit Gardens and Fleur Detroit , Thinking Outside the Boxwood Annual Trip to Detroit, Urban Detroit Gardens and Fleur Detroit , Thinking Outside the Boxwood Annual Trip to Detroit, Urban Detroit Gardens and Fleur Detroit , Thinking Outside the Boxwood

 

Our Trip also included a visit to Cranbrook Educational Community Campus in Bloomfield Hills and Greenfield Village in Dearborn. The sprawling Cranbrook campus includes k-9 schools, collage and two museums.

Annual Trip to Detroit, Cranbrook Educational Community Campus , Thinking Outside the Boxwood A water feature at the Cranbrook Art Museum. There was so much more to take photos of, but we had rambunctious kids, so taking photos was limited.

 

Annual Trip to Detroit, Cranbrook Educational Community Campus , Thinking Outside the Boxwood

This was the Corten landform at the entrance of the campus. Corten has yet to make its appearance in Columbus, but you see it all round in Detroit’s landscapes.

 

Below is are garden at an 1600’s English cottage at Greenfield Village. We spent a full five hours touring the buildings, playing and riding the train. What Henry Ford created was almost like the Disney World for historical life. Buildings from across America and England were transported to the village to compile a 300 year view into working and living experiences.

Annual Trip to Detroit, Greenfield Village , Thinking Outside the BoxwoodAnnual Trip to Detroit, Greenfield Village , Thinking Outside the Boxwood

 

So there was our Trip to Detroit in a 20 or so photos. I could add a few more must see places, so if anyone is interested in my complete list of places to see while in the area send me an email or comment. I feel like an unofficial ambassador for Southeast Michigan.