Garden Inspiration: Palace Het Loo

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Today in Central Ohio the temperatures are in the teens and the landscape it an abyss of white and grey.  Since I was feeling uninspired by my surrounding- I am sure that others may be in my shoes.  Over the years I have been very fortunate to visit gardens all over North America and Europe, call it a pilgrimage or a quest for inspiration.  One garden that inspired me was Palace Het Loo situated in Apeldoorn, Netherlands.  The Dutch Baroque garden, often called the ‘Versailles of Holland’. Though the gardens are similar to the Palace of Versailles , the gardens were not designed by Le Notre, rather his nephew Claude Desgots. The garden is formulated on the Baroque style of perfect symmetry, axial layout with radiating gravel walks, parterres with fountains, basins and statues.  If you are planning a summer trip to Holland I would recommend adding this to your stop.  I toured the gardens for about 3 hours and that seemed to be enough time.  Enjoy the photos and I hope you find inspiration.Garden Inspiration: Palace Het Loo, Thinking Outside the BoxwoodGarden Inspiration: Palace Het Loo, Thinking Outside the BoxwoodGarden Inspiration: Palace Het Loo, Thinking Outside the Boxwood- boxwood, nasturtium, and garden mums Garden Inspiration: Palace Het Loo, Thinking Outside the BoxwoodGarden Inspiration: Palace Het Loo, Thinking Outside the Boxwood- Taxus topiary and boxwood hedgesGarden Inspiration: Palace Het Loo, Thinking Outside the Boxwood- Axial symmetry and grand fountainsGarden Inspiration: Palace Het Loo, Thinking Outside the Boxwood- Hornbeam FramingGarden Inspiration: Palace Het Loo, Thinking Outside the Boxwood- Hornbeam avenue Garden Inspiration: Palace Het Loo, Thinking Outside the Boxwood- Boxwood and Orangery Garden Inspiration: Palace Het Loo, Thinking Outside the Boxwood- Beech hedgeGarden Inspiration: Palace Het Loo, Thinking Outside the Boxwood- Beech hedgeGarden Inspiration: Palace Het Loo, Thinking Outside the BoxwoodGarden Inspiration: Palace Het Loo, Thinking Outside the BoxwoodGarden Inspiration: Palace Het Loo, Thinking Outside the BoxwoodGarden Inspiration: Palace Het Loo, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

Case Study: Retail Embracing Green Space –Starbucks Downtown Disney

G A R D E N S, Garden Stores, Garden Structure, Garden Tours, gardening, Gardens, Green wall, Greenroofs, Inspiration, Landscape, Landscape Design | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

In early November, I traveled down to Orlando for the APLD 2014 International Design Conference (working on a recap post). On my last day I killed time walking around Downtown Disney before my flight home. The area is going through a phased redesign to become Disney Springs with completion in 2016. One of the new spaces already opened included Starbucks. The Starbucks owned store opened in June and is LEED certified like the previously opened store in Downtown Disney Anaheim. Apart of the LEED certification, the store features reclaimed materials, but of more interest to me is the green roof installed by Metro Verde.

Case Study: Retail Embracing Green Space –Starbucks Downtown Disney, Thinking Outside the Boxwood  Case Study: Retail Embracing Green Space –Starbucks Downtown Disney, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

This implementation is interesting because it features a retail company embracing green roofs on the individual store location level. The store’s green roof is 1,800 square feet, the roof is at most a tenth of the size to the other recent green roofs installed by retail giants like Walmart (40,600 sq feet in 2013) and Whole Foods (17,000 sq feet in 2013). The installation shows a commitment to the impact small scale incorporation of green spaces can have on the customers.

Case Study: Retail Embracing Green Space –Starbucks Downtown Disney, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

Even though customers cannot directly interact with the roof plantings, the grasses can be viewed from the ground and are a part of the full sensory experience. The roof also features LED lighting, which allows the plantings to be visible both day and night.  Metro Verde calculated the green roof produces enough oxygen per day for 4 people, not a huge impact environmental. However thinking about the swells of visitors the store will receive and exposure to plants used as key element of design, not after thought is pretty cool for a plant geek like myself.

Case Study: Retail Embracing Green Space –Starbucks Downtown Disney, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

greenroofs.com

 

Grasses Used:

  • Dwarf Fakahatchee, Tripscaum floridnum
  • Lemongrass, Cymbopogon citratus

 

Another interesting part of the Starbucks green roof story is the use of their own coffee grounds in the soil medium at both the nursery growing the grasses and in the continued care of the plants. This story was apart of Starbucks’ press release and marketing within the store. It makes me smile because of all the bags of used coffee grounds (Grounds for Your Garden) I have carted from our Starbucks and place the garden beds at home.

Case Study: Retail Embracing Green Space –Starbucks Downtown Disney, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

Right next to the Starbucks was another key plant area, a reincarnation of New York City’s High Line. Without knowing anything about this project, the finished area completely evoked the feeling of the High Line. Once fully completed the area will be home to food trucks, seating and great vista viewing. Over all it will be interesting to watch as Disney and all the partners help transform the new Disney Springs area.

Case Study: Retail Embracing Green Space –Starbucks Downtown Disney, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

Here are some great Links on the Project for more details:

  • Greenroofs.com (Background on the project with vendors, project details, etc)
  • Greenroof.coffee (website devoted to this specific project with great background)
  • Starbucks.com (press release and additional photos on the project)

 

 

If you want to read more about implementing a green roof at home check out:

Small Green Roofs: Low-Tech Options for Greener Living

By Nigel Dunnett, Dusty Gedge, John Little and Edmund C. Snodgrass

 

Kenneth Lynch & Sons, Inc.

Advice, C O N T A I N E R S, G A R D E N S, Garden Structure, gardening, Gardens, Inspiration, Landscape Products | Tagged , , ,

The other weekend my father-in-law gifted me with a copy of Kenneth Lynch & Son’s Garden Ornaments catalog from the 1970s. It is 176 pages of garden furniture, ornaments, containers, fountains, and statues made in cast stone, iron and lead. Tucked inside was a reprinted article from the September, 1951 issue of The Saturday Evening Post about the company founder, Kenneth Lynch. Trained as a blacksmith, Lynch was known for his work in restoring and recreating metal armor and motto “if its made of metal, Kenneth Lynch can make it.” He expanded his design offering from purchasing the cast off molds, dies and patterns from other metal smiths marginal lines.

Kenneth Lynch & Sons, Inc., Thinking Outside the Boxwood

On the left is my 1970s catalog. On the right is the catalog/book I received when I contacted Kenneth Lynch & Sons for a copy of their current catalog. There are some products that are listed in both, but both feature items not included in the other.  If you are interested in their products you really need to request a catalog or download the PDF version. The website does not provide great photo examples of their work outside the catalog. 

 

The Saturday Evening Post article gave a great framework on the company’s history and transformation. It includes the great lesson to always say yes and have a “can do attitude,” you never know where that will take you. My favorite anadote is how he had a police officer help him steal a one of a kind sample bench for the 1939-40 World’s Fair so he could copy measurements and make molds to help win the work fabricating the 800 benches needed for the fair. Also, he did the work within the two week deadline.

Kenneth Lynch & Sons, Inc., Thinking Outside the Boxwood

Here is the drawings for the Worlds Fair Bench, which is also used in New York City Parks. If interested you can still order this bench design. 

 

Even if you are not thinking of purchasing from the company, the catalogs give you great inspiration for design work and containers. Here are some detailed shots from inside the catalog of favorite pages.

Kenneth Lynch & Sons, Inc., Thinking Outside the Boxwood

A lot of these tables do not appear in the current catalog, but I like the legs on the wrought iron legs. Simple design without a lot of extra flourish. 

 

Kenneth Lynch & Sons, Inc., Thinking Outside the Boxwood

I gather planters were not a favorite product since there were just a few pages of containers. What they do offer are a lot of different shapes and scale. 

 

Kenneth Lynch & Sons, Inc., Thinking Outside the Boxwood

Showcase of the detailed banning options for lead containers. 

 

Kenneth Lynch & Sons, Inc., Thinking Outside the Boxwood

The animal shapes of the kids playground equipment are amazing and great reference for making some almost mid century topiary shapes. 

 

Kenneth Lynch & Sons, Inc., Thinking Outside the Boxwood Kenneth Lynch & Sons, Inc., Thinking Outside the Boxwood

The straight lines of the chairs on the bottom left feel modern and contemporary. Even the scroll own on the loungers are unique and different from current items on the market. 

 

Here are some photos from the current catalog of products. You can see the catalogs are set up much of the same way with black and white photos.

Kenneth Lynch & Sons, Inc., Thinking Outside the Boxwood Kenneth Lynch & Sons, Inc., Thinking Outside the Boxwood

Their current catalog has beautiful cisterns that would great in formal spaces or used as garden planters. The catalog also includes cast stone and lead animal statues; deer, dogs, birds and the more exotic kangaroo or hippo.  

 

I would recommend the 1970s (or 60’s) book for any garden designer for creative reference. I found a few listed on eBay for anyone interested:

  • 1966 Garden Ornaments Catalog, by Kenneth Lynch & Sons – currently $50, Buy it Now.
  • 1961 Garden Ornaments Wholesale Catalog – Kenneth Lynch & Sons – Currently $45, Buy it Now
  • Garden Ornament an Encyclopedia from Kenneth Lynch & Sons – currently $16 (this is a bound book compared to my copy, and looks to have different images)

Here are links to the Kenneth Lynch & Sons company information. I was not able to find a lot of color photograph examples of their products nor have I ever used their products.

 

If any one is interested in the full article from The Saturday Evening Post, I can scan the article and send you a pdf. It was very entertaining and you appreciate all that Lynch accomplished in his life.

Annual trip to Detroit

Advice, annuals, art, Formal Garden, G A R D E N S, Garden Stores, Garden Structure, gardening, Gardens, Landscape Design, Landscape Products | Tagged , , , , ,

Last weekend I made my semi-annual trip up to the northern suburbs of Detroit for work and inspiration reboot (there are lots of photos to share). I have posted about this trip before, but I find new inspiration each time I go. Detroit is in the news mainly about the post apocalyptic state and mass exodus of the city proper residents. However those who can invest in the city and outside in the suburbs, really are investing, building and taking pride in their area. I am not one to go into the politics of the situation, but I do advocate visiting Detroit. We ate very well, explored very different areas and met with passionate gardeners. The Pure Michigan commercials really are true.

 

One of the main reasons for the timing of our trip was to take part of Detroit Garden Work’s annual Garden Cruise benefiting Greening of Detroit. I believe Deborah Silver and the folks at Branch and Detroit Garden Works are true artists, craftsmen and really just pure genius. When we drive around, you can spot Deborah’s work instantly in either container design or the form she creates in a garden. I really wanted the chance to tour her gardens from more than the street, and the pleasure of touring her own garden at home. There were six gardens featured, some all by Deborah others were a combo of her and the home owners.  Here are photos from the gardens on the tour:

 

Annual Trip to Detroit,  Detroit Garden Work's Garden Cruise, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

The containers are Branch Studio designed and were planted well over 10 feet tall. The photo does not do the scale justice.

 

Annual Trip to Detroit,  Detroit Garden Work's Garden Cruise, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

 

The next house on the tour was a smaller Tudor style with a silver front yard and pure green structural back yard.

Annual Trip to Detroit,  Detroit Garden Work's Garden Cruise, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

This home featured a front bed planted with three pure silver plants, that provided a calm palette with movement and texture. See the photos below for the whole layered design.

Annual Trip to Detroit,  Detroit Garden Work's Garden Cruise, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

Annual Trip to Detroit,  Detroit Garden Work's Garden Cruise, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

The home also featured branch studio window boxes planted with:

Annual Trip to Detroit,  Detroit Garden Work's Garden Cruise, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

 

Annual Trip to Detroit,  Detroit Garden Work's Garden Cruise, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

The sphere and water features are both designed by Branch Studio via Detroit Garden Works.

 

Another house on the tour featured an elliptical shaped garden and a border of perennials- but the true show stoppers were the twin fountains flanking the central walkway.

Annual Trip to Detroit,  Detroit Garden Work's Garden Cruise, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

 

Our final stop on the tour was Deborah’s home. The show stopping feature were the home’s original containers (featured below) and her bubbling water feature. Annual Trip to Detroit,  Detroit Garden Work's Garden Cruise, Thinking Outside the Boxwood Annual Trip to Detroit,  Detroit Garden Work's Garden Cruise, Thinking Outside the Boxwood Annual Trip to Detroit,  Detroit Garden Work's Garden Cruise, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

Annual Trip to Detroit,  Detroit Garden Work's Garden Cruise, Thinking Outside the BoxwoodAnnual Trip to Detroit,  Detroit Garden Work's Garden Cruise, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

Annual Trip to Detroit,  Detroit Garden Work's Garden Cruise, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

 

Since our trip was to pick up some containers from Detroit Garden Works, Here are some photos from the store. They create and import some of the finest garden containers and decor. Always worth a visit to see the unique.

Annual Trip to Detroit,  Detroit Garden Works, Thinking Outside the Boxwood Annual Trip to Detroit,  Detroit Garden Works, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

 

This water feature was insane. It was created by welding all the individual rods by men swapping every 20 minutes to ensure a random pattern.

Annual Trip to Detroit,  Detroit Garden Works, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

 

We also made our first visit to Urban Detroit Gardens and Fleur Detroit which is just down the street from Detroit Garden Works. Honestly kicked ourselves for never stopping on previous trips. The shop blends the entire garden lifestyle with outdoor, interiors and flowers/events.

Annual Trip to Detroit, Urban Detroit Gardens and Fleur Detroit , Thinking Outside the Boxwood Annual Trip to Detroit, Urban Detroit Gardens and Fleur Detroit , Thinking Outside the Boxwood Annual Trip to Detroit, Urban Detroit Gardens and Fleur Detroit , Thinking Outside the Boxwood

 

Our Trip also included a visit to Cranbrook Educational Community Campus in Bloomfield Hills and Greenfield Village in Dearborn. The sprawling Cranbrook campus includes k-9 schools, collage and two museums.

Annual Trip to Detroit, Cranbrook Educational Community Campus , Thinking Outside the Boxwood A water feature at the Cranbrook Art Museum. There was so much more to take photos of, but we had rambunctious kids, so taking photos was limited.

 

Annual Trip to Detroit, Cranbrook Educational Community Campus , Thinking Outside the Boxwood

This was the Corten landform at the entrance of the campus. Corten has yet to make its appearance in Columbus, but you see it all round in Detroit’s landscapes.

 

Below is are garden at an 1600’s English cottage at Greenfield Village. We spent a full five hours touring the buildings, playing and riding the train. What Henry Ford created was almost like the Disney World for historical life. Buildings from across America and England were transported to the village to compile a 300 year view into working and living experiences.

Annual Trip to Detroit, Greenfield Village , Thinking Outside the BoxwoodAnnual Trip to Detroit, Greenfield Village , Thinking Outside the Boxwood

 

So there was our Trip to Detroit in a 20 or so photos. I could add a few more must see places, so if anyone is interested in my complete list of places to see while in the area send me an email or comment. I feel like an unofficial ambassador for Southeast Michigan.

 

Garden Design Magazine

C O N T A I N E R S, Formal Garden, Garden Design Magazine, Garden Structure, gardening, Gardens, Landscape Design, My Work, Plants | Tagged , , , , ,

On Tuesday evening a box of fresh off the press copies of the relaunched Garden Design Magazine arrived at my house.  I know I cannot provide a truly objective point of view since I contributed an article (page #62 ) and pretty much stop every ten minutes to confirm it is really there. But the magazine is must subscribe and great coffee table book.

GARDEN DESIGN MAGAZINE IS BACK! Thinking Outside the Boxwood

 

When the magazine shut back in 2013, it was sad but not initially mourned. Its last issues were too west coast, uber high end, and less grounded in horticulture. Then I started reading shelter magazines for their garden features and just got annoyed. Great photos, but plant IDs were limited to boxwood, roses, lavender and hydrangeas and never helped readers gain any plant knowledge. Worse yet, articles always skipped over the often amazing landscape designers and architects that created the spaces. Garden Design needed to come back!

 

The team at the magazine really listened to all the chatter about the magazine, interviewed readers, and realigned to create a garden magazine that can be enjoyed by people across zones, coasts, yard size and level of horticulture knowledge.  The magazine includes no ads or sponsored content and the paper is think with some heft to the magazine.  Congratulations to the team at the magazine and thank you for allowing me to be a part of it. I pinch myself you included me with the cool kids (ahem, Dan Hinkley) in helping to bring it back.

 

Ok, now go subscribe!

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lacking Inspiration Scrap Wood Walls

Garden Structure, wood walls

div class=”separator” style=”clear: both; text-align: left;”Sorry for the lack of posts lately, but last week I was totally lacking inspiration. I have been busy with client project installs, scheduling spreadsheets, and normal businessnbsp;administrationnbsp;work. However the long weekend I was able to refresh, and after this week I have a vacation to recharge. In case you are also missing inspiration to get you going. Here are some images of wood walls in the landscape./divbr /table align=”center” cellpadding=”0″ cellspacing=”0″ class=”tr-caption-container” style=”margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;”tbodytrtd style=”text-align: center;”a href=”http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-98AS5sXozPo/TmV4PneVgnI/AAAAAAAAAts/7wqkoSSlSDU/s1600/birchlogs_loosewall.jpg” imageanchor=”1″ style=”margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;”img border=”0″ height=”400″ src=”http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-98AS5sXozPo/TmV4PneVgnI/AAAAAAAAAts/7wqkoSSlSDU/s400/birchlogs_loosewall.jpg” width=”266″ //a/td/trtrtd class=”tr-caption” style=”text-align: center;”From the Chelsea Flower Show Via a href=”http://www.flickr.com/photos/veronicak/4656938571/in/faves-26092888@N03/”Flickr/a/td/tr/tbody/tabletable align=”center” cellpadding=”0″ cellspacing=”0″ class=”tr-caption-container” style=”margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;”tbodytrtd style=”text-align: center;”a href=”http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-of0bLkPjHcs/TmV72vtWPrI/AAAAAAAAAtw/SX21rlnuAKU/s1600/4896428524_35441301f5_o.jpg” imageanchor=”1″ style=”margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;”img border=”0″ height=”300″ src=”http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-of0bLkPjHcs/TmV72vtWPrI/AAAAAAAAAtw/SX21rlnuAKU/s400/4896428524_35441301f5_o.jpg” width=”400″ //a/td/trtrtd class=”tr-caption” style=”text-align: center;”Inside a steel frame. the location of this wall looks odd to me – I think it would work great flanked by a tall hedges.br /Image from a href=”http://www.flickr.com/photos/37931875@N00/4896428524/”flickr/a./td/tr/tbody/tabletable align=”center” cellpadding=”0″ cellspacing=”0″ class=”tr-caption-container” style=”margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;”tbodytrtd style=”text-align: center;”a href=”http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-Ln6fFFQLXiM/TmV8_2BqYCI/AAAAAAAAAt0/lu9_4d2LQkI/s1600/plastolux_woodslatwall.jpg” imageanchor=”1″ style=”margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;”img border=”0″ height=”292″ src=”http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-Ln6fFFQLXiM/TmV8_2BqYCI/AAAAAAAAAt0/lu9_4d2LQkI/s400/plastolux_woodslatwall.jpg” width=”400″ //a/td/trtrtd class=”tr-caption” style=”text-align: center;”This is not split wood wall – but scrap wood over a concrete wall.br /Found a href=”http://plastolux.com/category/modern-landscaping/page/8″here/a./td/tr/tbody/tabletable align=”center” cellpadding=”0″ cellspacing=”0″ class=”tr-caption-container” style=”margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;”tbodytrtd style=”text-align: center;”a href=”http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-A_sG58U6Koo/TmV-KyzlwHI/AAAAAAAAAt4/SUQ9Ogv2YP0/s1600/Gehry+Wall.JPG” imageanchor=”1″ style=”margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;”img border=”0″ height=”240″ src=”http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-A_sG58U6Koo/TmV-KyzlwHI/AAAAAAAAAt4/SUQ9Ogv2YP0/s400/Gehry+Wall.JPG” width=”400″ //a/td/trtrtd class=”tr-caption” style=”text-align: center;”This wall looks like a giant Jenga wall.br /Found a href=”http://westsiderealestateroundup.blogspot.com/”here/a/td/tr/tbody/tabletable align=”center” cellpadding=”0″ cellspacing=”0″ class=”tr-caption-container” style=”margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;”tbodytrtd style=”text-align: center;”a href=”http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-6JbWizbQ0LA/TmV_Dszc41I/AAAAAAAAAt8/UTX4tktj3qE/s1600/gregyale_stonepathlighting.jpg” imageanchor=”1″ style=”margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;”img border=”0″ height=”267″ src=”http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-6JbWizbQ0LA/TmV_Dszc41I/AAAAAAAAAt8/UTX4tktj3qE/s400/gregyale_stonepathlighting.jpg” width=”400″ //a/td/trtrtd class=”tr-caption” style=”text-align: center;”I posted about this wall before, but the split wood creates a low wall that is annbsp;extensionnbsp;of the nbsp;stone wall, and is easy to access for fires, etc.br /Image from a href=”http://www.gregyale.com/www/”here/a./td/tr/tbody/table

Garden Gates and Fences

Garden Structure

I have been thinking about garden gates as we plan to fence in our backyard for James. We have fence on three of the four sides already, so just need to connect across the front from the sides to the house. this short distance provides us with some flexibility to be creative on the fence design since it is a short distance and will be visible from the front of the house. Here are a variety of gates (and some fences) I have been storing for inspiration. 

This gate mimics a front door with the windows and size. Surrounded by the privet hedge, there is no guessing where the entrance is located.
Image from House & Garden

This gate adds height with the arbor and the surrounding fence. The large grid does not provide privacy, but would be great for adding a climbing rose/etc.
Image – not sure location.
This gate is surrounded in brick and speaks to a secret garden.
Image House & Garden
A double hinged gate allows for a larger entrance space when opening up the yard for parties etc.
This fence also uses a grid compared to traditional pickets.
Image from House & Garden
A traditional picket fence and gate. When looking for classic, you cannot not miss with this design.
Image from unknown. 
This is not of a gate, but could be easily converted into a gate design. The pickets on the right are traditional, but switch styles of round close to the steps to become railing. The mix of styles between fences provides more interest.
Image from Pink Wallpaper.
This fence from Nantucket mixes the ceder shakes with a white gate. The center open area gives you a peek of what is on the other side. In this case the ocean.
Image from Flickr.
Another more traditional style gate, but you can see with the posts and treatment of the cross supports can have a variety looks.
Image from Martha Stewart.
Ok this is not a fence or gate, however when I saw this image I thought it would be the perfect fence. Modern in design, but still with a nod to the class white picket fence. Plus the metal grates would allow of plants to grow between. This might be the winner for my house, but we will see.
Image from Hinkley Lighting

Looking for Shade

Garden Structure
The back of my house gets limited shade in the summer months, and with this heat wave I have been looking into options for shading the lounge area. I think we will use a shade sail as a temporary option, but would love to have something more structural. In the meantime I will draw inspiration from these great shady areas. 

Tall allee of trees provide the best shade.
Image from Arch. Digest.
Arbors provide wonderful shade and structure with less time to mature like the  trees.
Planting a climbing wisteria will also provide color.
Image from Martha Stewart
I love how modern this arbor feels, white and streamlined. The wide top grid will not provide enough shade in my yard, but if I add shade sails between would be perfect.
Image from BHG.com