FOUND – Ina Garten’s Firebowl

Inspiration, Landscape Products | Tagged , , , , , , ,

FOUND - Ina Garten's Firebowl, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

 (Image from The New York Times article – here)

 

I have long admired Ina Garten’s home and gardens from the articles published and images shared. I recently caught the tail end of her cooking show and was caught by the scale of her firebowl.  At 68 inches wide, the bowl is very wide (bigger than my dinning room table), but it is also elevated just below your waist thanks to a three-legged stand.  The scale and height makes it so unique and complements the scale of the sounding architecture and landscape. The height & size are great for cocktail gatherings where people mingle compared to lounging around encircle.  I was able to locate the same bowl via FireFeatures.  The specifications denote 68NL Mild Steel Firebowl with three-legged stand, without the stand is about $4,300.  Not necessarily a price point for everyone, but gets you thinking of a different scale/height to use a firebowl.

 

FOUND - Ina Garten's Firebowl, Thinking Outside the BoxwoodFOUND - Ina Garten's Firebowl, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

I attempted to find some images of the bowl with people around for scale, and this photo via Foodnetwork.ca episode guide was as close as I could get. 

 

 

In reviewing the FireFeatures website, I found another project with a large bowl that included a mixed branch insert.  Intrigued by the surrounding gardens, I located additional photos of the project.  The property design is attributed to Benjamin Noriega-Ortiz and Brian E. Boyle, however I am unsure if they complete the garden design. I found the additional photos of the project via Yatzer.

FOUND - Ina Garten's Firebowl, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

FOUND - Ina Garten's Firebowl, Thinking Outside the Boxwood FOUND - Ina Garten's Firebowl, Thinking Outside the Boxwood FOUND - Ina Garten's Firebowl, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

 

The Barefoot Contessa episode I watched also included lighting designer Grey Yale, whose designs are featured throughout Ina’s home. He created the nighttime dinner lighting and used large helium balloons filled with lights flying over the barn patio area in addition to party lights in the trees. Despite fruitless efforts to find a photo of the party, I did find some 36’ white round balloons and LED balloon lights  via Amazon you could use to recreate the look.  I am going to give it a try, just need the right occasion to celebrate.

Kenneth Lynch & Sons, Inc.

Advice, C O N T A I N E R S, G A R D E N S, Garden Structure, gardening, Gardens, Inspiration, Landscape Products | Tagged , , ,

The other weekend my father-in-law gifted me with a copy of Kenneth Lynch & Son’s Garden Ornaments catalog from the 1970s. It is 176 pages of garden furniture, ornaments, containers, fountains, and statues made in cast stone, iron and lead. Tucked inside was a reprinted article from the September, 1951 issue of The Saturday Evening Post about the company founder, Kenneth Lynch. Trained as a blacksmith, Lynch was known for his work in restoring and recreating metal armor and motto “if its made of metal, Kenneth Lynch can make it.” He expanded his design offering from purchasing the cast off molds, dies and patterns from other metal smiths marginal lines.

Kenneth Lynch & Sons, Inc., Thinking Outside the Boxwood

On the left is my 1970s catalog. On the right is the catalog/book I received when I contacted Kenneth Lynch & Sons for a copy of their current catalog. There are some products that are listed in both, but both feature items not included in the other.  If you are interested in their products you really need to request a catalog or download the PDF version. The website does not provide great photo examples of their work outside the catalog. 

 

The Saturday Evening Post article gave a great framework on the company’s history and transformation. It includes the great lesson to always say yes and have a “can do attitude,” you never know where that will take you. My favorite anadote is how he had a police officer help him steal a one of a kind sample bench for the 1939-40 World’s Fair so he could copy measurements and make molds to help win the work fabricating the 800 benches needed for the fair. Also, he did the work within the two week deadline.

Kenneth Lynch & Sons, Inc., Thinking Outside the Boxwood

Here is the drawings for the Worlds Fair Bench, which is also used in New York City Parks. If interested you can still order this bench design. 

 

Even if you are not thinking of purchasing from the company, the catalogs give you great inspiration for design work and containers. Here are some detailed shots from inside the catalog of favorite pages.

Kenneth Lynch & Sons, Inc., Thinking Outside the Boxwood

A lot of these tables do not appear in the current catalog, but I like the legs on the wrought iron legs. Simple design without a lot of extra flourish. 

 

Kenneth Lynch & Sons, Inc., Thinking Outside the Boxwood

I gather planters were not a favorite product since there were just a few pages of containers. What they do offer are a lot of different shapes and scale. 

 

Kenneth Lynch & Sons, Inc., Thinking Outside the Boxwood

Showcase of the detailed banning options for lead containers. 

 

Kenneth Lynch & Sons, Inc., Thinking Outside the Boxwood

The animal shapes of the kids playground equipment are amazing and great reference for making some almost mid century topiary shapes. 

 

Kenneth Lynch & Sons, Inc., Thinking Outside the Boxwood Kenneth Lynch & Sons, Inc., Thinking Outside the Boxwood

The straight lines of the chairs on the bottom left feel modern and contemporary. Even the scroll own on the loungers are unique and different from current items on the market. 

 

Here are some photos from the current catalog of products. You can see the catalogs are set up much of the same way with black and white photos.

Kenneth Lynch & Sons, Inc., Thinking Outside the Boxwood Kenneth Lynch & Sons, Inc., Thinking Outside the Boxwood

Their current catalog has beautiful cisterns that would great in formal spaces or used as garden planters. The catalog also includes cast stone and lead animal statues; deer, dogs, birds and the more exotic kangaroo or hippo.  

 

I would recommend the 1970s (or 60’s) book for any garden designer for creative reference. I found a few listed on eBay for anyone interested:

  • 1966 Garden Ornaments Catalog, by Kenneth Lynch & Sons – currently $50, Buy it Now.
  • 1961 Garden Ornaments Wholesale Catalog – Kenneth Lynch & Sons – Currently $45, Buy it Now
  • Garden Ornament an Encyclopedia from Kenneth Lynch & Sons – currently $16 (this is a bound book compared to my copy, and looks to have different images)

Here are links to the Kenneth Lynch & Sons company information. I was not able to find a lot of color photograph examples of their products nor have I ever used their products.

 

If any one is interested in the full article from The Saturday Evening Post, I can scan the article and send you a pdf. It was very entertaining and you appreciate all that Lynch accomplished in his life.

Annual trip to Detroit

Advice, annuals, art, Formal Garden, G A R D E N S, Garden Stores, Garden Structure, gardening, Gardens, Landscape Design, Landscape Products | Tagged , , , , ,

Last weekend I made my semi-annual trip up to the northern suburbs of Detroit for work and inspiration reboot (there are lots of photos to share). I have posted about this trip before, but I find new inspiration each time I go. Detroit is in the news mainly about the post apocalyptic state and mass exodus of the city proper residents. However those who can invest in the city and outside in the suburbs, really are investing, building and taking pride in their area. I am not one to go into the politics of the situation, but I do advocate visiting Detroit. We ate very well, explored very different areas and met with passionate gardeners. The Pure Michigan commercials really are true.

 

One of the main reasons for the timing of our trip was to take part of Detroit Garden Work’s annual Garden Cruise benefiting Greening of Detroit. I believe Deborah Silver and the folks at Branch and Detroit Garden Works are true artists, craftsmen and really just pure genius. When we drive around, you can spot Deborah’s work instantly in either container design or the form she creates in a garden. I really wanted the chance to tour her gardens from more than the street, and the pleasure of touring her own garden at home. There were six gardens featured, some all by Deborah others were a combo of her and the home owners.  Here are photos from the gardens on the tour:

 

Annual Trip to Detroit,  Detroit Garden Work's Garden Cruise, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

The containers are Branch Studio designed and were planted well over 10 feet tall. The photo does not do the scale justice.

 

Annual Trip to Detroit,  Detroit Garden Work's Garden Cruise, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

 

The next house on the tour was a smaller Tudor style with a silver front yard and pure green structural back yard.

Annual Trip to Detroit,  Detroit Garden Work's Garden Cruise, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

This home featured a front bed planted with three pure silver plants, that provided a calm palette with movement and texture. See the photos below for the whole layered design.

Annual Trip to Detroit,  Detroit Garden Work's Garden Cruise, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

Annual Trip to Detroit,  Detroit Garden Work's Garden Cruise, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

The home also featured branch studio window boxes planted with:

Annual Trip to Detroit,  Detroit Garden Work's Garden Cruise, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

 

Annual Trip to Detroit,  Detroit Garden Work's Garden Cruise, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

The sphere and water features are both designed by Branch Studio via Detroit Garden Works.

 

Another house on the tour featured an elliptical shaped garden and a border of perennials- but the true show stoppers were the twin fountains flanking the central walkway.

Annual Trip to Detroit,  Detroit Garden Work's Garden Cruise, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

 

Our final stop on the tour was Deborah’s home. The show stopping feature were the home’s original containers (featured below) and her bubbling water feature. Annual Trip to Detroit,  Detroit Garden Work's Garden Cruise, Thinking Outside the Boxwood Annual Trip to Detroit,  Detroit Garden Work's Garden Cruise, Thinking Outside the Boxwood Annual Trip to Detroit,  Detroit Garden Work's Garden Cruise, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

Annual Trip to Detroit,  Detroit Garden Work's Garden Cruise, Thinking Outside the BoxwoodAnnual Trip to Detroit,  Detroit Garden Work's Garden Cruise, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

Annual Trip to Detroit,  Detroit Garden Work's Garden Cruise, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

 

Since our trip was to pick up some containers from Detroit Garden Works, Here are some photos from the store. They create and import some of the finest garden containers and decor. Always worth a visit to see the unique.

Annual Trip to Detroit,  Detroit Garden Works, Thinking Outside the Boxwood Annual Trip to Detroit,  Detroit Garden Works, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

 

This water feature was insane. It was created by welding all the individual rods by men swapping every 20 minutes to ensure a random pattern.

Annual Trip to Detroit,  Detroit Garden Works, Thinking Outside the Boxwood

 

We also made our first visit to Urban Detroit Gardens and Fleur Detroit which is just down the street from Detroit Garden Works. Honestly kicked ourselves for never stopping on previous trips. The shop blends the entire garden lifestyle with outdoor, interiors and flowers/events.

Annual Trip to Detroit, Urban Detroit Gardens and Fleur Detroit , Thinking Outside the Boxwood Annual Trip to Detroit, Urban Detroit Gardens and Fleur Detroit , Thinking Outside the Boxwood Annual Trip to Detroit, Urban Detroit Gardens and Fleur Detroit , Thinking Outside the Boxwood

 

Our Trip also included a visit to Cranbrook Educational Community Campus in Bloomfield Hills and Greenfield Village in Dearborn. The sprawling Cranbrook campus includes k-9 schools, collage and two museums.

Annual Trip to Detroit, Cranbrook Educational Community Campus , Thinking Outside the Boxwood A water feature at the Cranbrook Art Museum. There was so much more to take photos of, but we had rambunctious kids, so taking photos was limited.

 

Annual Trip to Detroit, Cranbrook Educational Community Campus , Thinking Outside the Boxwood

This was the Corten landform at the entrance of the campus. Corten has yet to make its appearance in Columbus, but you see it all round in Detroit’s landscapes.

 

Below is are garden at an 1600’s English cottage at Greenfield Village. We spent a full five hours touring the buildings, playing and riding the train. What Henry Ford created was almost like the Disney World for historical life. Buildings from across America and England were transported to the village to compile a 300 year view into working and living experiences.

Annual Trip to Detroit, Greenfield Village , Thinking Outside the BoxwoodAnnual Trip to Detroit, Greenfield Village , Thinking Outside the Boxwood

 

So there was our Trip to Detroit in a 20 or so photos. I could add a few more must see places, so if anyone is interested in my complete list of places to see while in the area send me an email or comment. I feel like an unofficial ambassador for Southeast Michigan.